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12-Deoxywithastramonolide

$610

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0475

  • Specification : 95.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 60124-17-6

  • Formula : C28H38O6

  • Molecular Weight : 470.598

  • PUBCHEM ID : 44576309

  • Volume : 10mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0475

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

95.0%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

470.598

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Steroids

Category

SMILES

CC1=C(C(=O)OC(C1)C(C)C2CCC3C2(CCC4C3C5C(O5)C6(C4(C(=O)C=CC6)C)O)C)CO

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

(1S,2S,4S,5R,10R,11S,14R,15R,18S)-5-hydroxy-15-[(1S)-1-[(2R)-5-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methyl-6-oxo-2,3-dihydropyran-2-yl]ethyl]-10,14-dimethyl-3-oxapentacyclo[9.7.0.02,4.05,10.014,18]octadec-7-en-9-one

Applications

Density

1.253

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

Boiling Point

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C28H38O6/c1-14-12-20(33-25(31)16(14)13-29)15(2)17-7-8-18-22-19(9-11-26(17,18)3)27(4)21(30)6-5-10-28(27,32)24-23(22)34-24/h5-6,15,17-20,22-24,29,32H,7-13H2,1-4H3/t15-,17+,18-,19-,20+,22-,23-,24-,26+,27-,28-/m0/s1

InChl Key

AWVMHXZWAKRDGG-MEBIVHGNSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:60124-17-6) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

27358605

Abstract

Religious attendance is an important element of activity for older Europeans, especially in more traditional countries. The aim of the analysis is to explore whether it could be an element contributing to active ageing as well as to assess differences between the religious activity of older individuals with and without multimorbidity defined as an occurrence of two or more illnesses. The analysis is conducted based on the SHARE database (2010-2011) covering 57,391 individuals 50+ from 16 European countries. Logistic regressions are calculated to assess predictors of religious activity. Results point that religious activity often occurs in multimorbidity what could be driven by the need for comfort and compensation from religion. It is also significantly correlated with other types of social activities: volunteering or learning, even among the population with multimorbidity. There is a positive relation between religious activity and age, although its effect is weaker in the case of multimorbidity, as well as being female. Mobility limitations are found to decrease religious participation in both morbidity groups and might be related to discontinuation of religious practices in older age. The economic situation of older individuals is an insignificant factor for religious attendance. Religious attendance can be an element of active ageing, but also a compensation and adaptation to disadvantages occurring in older age and multimorbidity. At the same time, religious activities are often provided at the community level and targeted to population in poorer health.

KEYWORDS

Older people, Ageing, Health status, Morbidity, Religious participation

Title

Predictors of religious participation of older Europeans in good and poor health

Author

Agnieszka Sowa,corresponding author1,2 Stanisława Golinowska,1,2,3 Dorly Deeg,4 Andrea Principi,5 Georgia Casanova,5 Katherine Schulmann,6 Stephania Ilinca,6 Ricardo Rodrigues,6 Amilcar Moreira,7 and Henrike Gelenkamp4

Publish date

2016 Jun;

PMID

32143344

Abstract

This paper identifies, within companies’ sectors of activity, predictors of Human Resource (HR) policies to extend working life (EWL) in light of increasing policy efforts at the European level to extend working life. Three types of EWL practices are investigated: the prevention of early retirement (i.e., encouraging employees to continue working until the legal retirement age); delay of retirement (i.e., encouraging employees to continue working beyond the legal retirement age); and, recruitment of employees who are already retired (i.e., unretirement). A sample of 4624 European organizations that was stratified by size and sector is analyzed in six countries. The main drivers for companies’ EWL practices are the implementation of measures for older workers to improve their performance, their working conditions, and to reduce costs. In industry, the qualities and skills of older workers could be more valued than in other sectors, while the adoption of EWL practices might be less affected by external economic and labor market factors in the public sector. Dutch and Italian employers may be less prone than others to extend working lives. These results underline the importance of raising employers’ awareness and increase their actions to extend employees’ working lives by adopting age management initiatives, especially in SMEs, and in the services and public sectors.

KEYWORDS

older workers, age management, extending working life, employers, international study

Title

Employees’ Longer Working Lives in Europe: Drivers and Barriers in Companies

Author

Andrea Principi,1 Jurgen Bauknecht,2 Mirko Di Rosa,3,* and Marco Socci1

Publish date

2020 Mar;

PMID

32244446

Abstract

The debate on policies addressing the challenges posed by population ageing pays increasing attention to sustainable and innovative ways to tackle the multidimensional impact this phenomenon has on society and individuals. Moving from the findings of two European research projects, a qualitative study based on a rapid review of the literature, expert interviews, focus groups and case studies analysis has been carried out in Italy. This study illustrates which social innovations have been recently implemented in this country’s long-term care (LTC) sector, and the areas in which further steps are urgently needed in the future. This takes place by first highlighting the existing links between social innovation and LTC, and then by identifying the key factors that can facilitate or hinder the implementation of these initiatives. Finally, the study suggests how to promote social innovation, by strengthening the “integration” and “coordination” of available services and resources, through a—for this country still relatively—new approach towards ageing, based on pillars such as prevention and education campaigns on how to promote well-being in older age.

KEYWORDS

social innovation, long-term care, Italy, ageing

Title

Social Innovation in Long-Term Care: Lessons from the Italian Case

Author

Georgia Casanova,* Andrea Principi, and Giovanni Lamura

Publish date

2020 Apr;