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1,2-O-Dilinoleoyl-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylracglycerol

$672

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0035

  • Specification : 98.5%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 111187-15-6

  • Formula : C45H78O10

  • Molecular Weight : 779.09

  • Volume : 10mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0035

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98.5%(HPLC)

Storage

-20℃

Molecular Weight

779.09

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Miscellaneous

Category

SMILES

CCCCCC=CCC=CCCCCCCCC(=O)OCC(COC1C(C(C(C(O1)CO)O)O)O)OC(=O)CCCCCCCC=CCC=CCCCCC

Synonyms

[(2R)-2-[(9Z,12Z)-octadeca-9,12-dienoyl]oxy-3-[(2R,3R,4S,5S,6R)-3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]oxypropyl] (9Z,12Z)-octadeca-9,12-dienoate

IUPAC Name

Applications

Density

1.1±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

228.9±27.8 °C

Boiling Point

825.9±65.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C45H78O10/c1-3-5-7-9-11-13-15-17-19-21-23-25-27-29-31-33-40(47)52-36-38(37-53-45-44(51)43(50)42(49)39(35-46)55-45)54-41(48)34-32-30-28-26-24-22-20-18-16-14-12-10-8-6-4-2/h11-14,17-20,38-39,42-46,49-51H,3-10,15-16,21-37H2,1-2H3/b13-11-,14-12-,19-17-,20-18-/t38-,39+,42+,43-,44+,45+/m0/s1

InChl Key

BROOMPUVDPTGEG-WPFDGFPQSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:111187-15-6) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

27821085

Abstract

Background
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults even in developed countries. Several lifestyle factors and comorbidities have been linked to an increased risk, although their prevalence has not been well documented in the primary care setting. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence, risk factor and comorbid conditions distribution of CAP in adults in primary care in Spain.

Methods
Retrospective observational study in adults (>18 years-old) with CAP diagnosed and attended at primary care in Spain between 2009 and 2013, using the Computerized Database for Pharmacoepidemiological Studies in Primary Care (BIFAP).

Results
Twenty-eight thousand four hundred thirteen patient records were retrieved and analyzed. Mean age (standard deviation): 60.5 (20.3) years, 51.7 % males. Global incidence of CAP in adults was estimated at 4.63 per 1000 persons/year. CAP incidence increased progressively with age, ranging from a 1.98 at 18-20 years of age to 23.74 in patients over 90 years of age. According to sex, global CAP incidence was slightly higher in males (5.04) than females (4.26); CAP incidence from 18 to 65 year-olds up was comparable between males (range: 2.18-5.75) and females (range: 1.47-5.21), whereas from 65 years of age, CAP incidence was noticeable higher in males (range: 7.06-36.93) than in females (range: 5.43-19.62). Average prevalence of risk factors was 71.3 %, which increased with age, doubling the risk in males by the age of 75 (females 20 % vs males 40 %). From 55 years of age, at least one risk factor was identified in 85.7 % of cases: one risk factor (23.8 %), two risk factors (23.4 %), three or more risk factors (38.5 %). Major risk factors were: metabolic disease (27.4 %), cardiovascular disease (17.8 %) and diabetes (15.5 %).

Conclusions
The annual incidence of CAP in primary care adults in Spain is high, comparable between males and females up to 65 years of age, but clearly increasing in males from that age. CAP risk increases with age and doubles in males older than 75 years. The majority of CAP cases in patients over 55 years of age is associated to at least one risk factor. The main risk factors associated were metabolic disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12879-016-1974-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

KEYWORDS

Community-acquired pneumonia, Vaccine-preventable diseases, Risk factors, Incidence, Antibiotics, Primary care

Title

Incidence and risk factor prevalence of community-acquired pneumonia in adults in primary care in Spain (NEUMO-ES-RISK project)

Author

I. Rivero-Calle,#1,2 J. Pardo-Seco,2 P. Aldaz,3 D. A. Vargas,4 E. Mascaros,5 E. Redondo,6 J. L. Diaz-Maroto,7 M. Linares-Rufo,8 M. J. Fierro-Alacio,9 A. Gil,10 J. Molina,11 D. OcaNa,12 Federico Martinon-Torres,corresponding author#1,2 and on behalf of NEUMOEXPERTOS group

Publish date

2016

PMID

27973420

Abstract

Two novel carbohydrate-derived pyridyl (PYOX)- and cyclopropyl (CYBOX)-substituted oxazoline ligands were prepared from d-glucosamine hydrochloride and 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-amino-2-deoxy-β-d-glucopyranose hydrochloride in two steps, respectively. The sugar-annulated PYOX ligand formed a stable metal complex with Pd(II), which was fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. NMR and X-ray analysis revealed a change of the conformation in the sugar moiety upon complexation with the palladium(II) species. Both glycosylated ligands resulted in high asymmetric induction (up to 98% ee) upon application as chiral ligands in the Pd-catalyzed allylic alkylation of rac-1,3-diphenylallyl acetate with dimethyl malonate (Tsuji-Trost reaction). Both ligands provided mainly the (R)-enantiomer of the alkylation product.

KEYWORDS

asymmetric catalysis, carbohydrates, oxazolines, palladium complexes, pyridines, Tsuji-Trost

Title

Sugar-Annulated Oxazoline Ligands: A Novel Pd(II) Complex and Its Application in Allylic Substitution

Author

Jochen Kraft, Katharina Mill, and Thomas Ziegler*

Publish date

2016 Dec

PMID

31954763

Abstract

Background
Viral respiratory illnesses are common causes of outbreaks and can be fatal to some patients.

Aim
To investigate the association between laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections and potential sources of exposure during the previous 7 days.

Methods
In this nested case-control analysis, healthcare personnel from nine Canadian hospitals who developed acute respiratory illnesses during the winters of 2010/11-2013/14 submitted swabs that were tested for viral pathogens. Associated illness diaries and the weekly diaries of non-ill participants provided information on contact with people displaying symptoms of acute respiratory illness in the previous week. Conditional logistic regression assessed the association between cases, who were matched by study week and site with controls with no respiratory symptoms.

Findings
There were 814 laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory illnesses. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of a viral illness was higher for healthcare personnel reporting exposures to ill household members [7.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.4-9.1], co-workers (3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.7) or other social contacts (5.1, 95% CI 3.6-7.1). Exposures to patients with respiratory illness were not associated with infection (aOR 0.9, 95% CI 0.7-1.2); however, healthcare personnel with direct patient contact did have higher odds (aOR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.6). The aORs for exposure and for direct patient contact were similar for illnesses caused by influenza.

Conclusion
Community and co-worker contacts are important sources of viral respiratory illness in healthcare personnel, while exposure to patients with recognized respiratory infections is not associated. The comparatively low risk associated with direct patient contact may reflect transmission related to asymptomatic patients or unrecognized infections.

KEYWORDS

Respiratory, Healthcare worker, Hospital, Transmission, Viral, Exposure, Adult

Title

Sources of viral respiratory infections in Canadian acute care hospital healthcare personnel

Author

S. Buckrell,a B.L. Coleman,a,b,∗ S.A. McNeil,c K. Katz,d,e M.P. Muller,e,f A. Simor,e,g M. Loeb,h J. Powis,i S.P. Kuster,j J.M. Di Bella,b K.K.L. Coleman,b,k S.J. Drews,l,m P. Kohler,n A. McGeer,b,e and for the Canadian Healthcare Worker Study Group†

Publish date

2020 Apr