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2″-O-Glucosylrutin

$1,056

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O0925

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 55696-55-4

  • Formula : C33H40O21

  • Molecular Weight : 772.66

  • Volume : 5mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O0925

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

772.66

Appearance

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

Density

Solubility

Flash Point

Boiling Point

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C10H19NO/c1-5-10(4)7-8(12)6-9(2,3)11-10/h11H,5-7H2,1-4H3

InChl Key

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:55696-55-4) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

28042072

Abstract

Context
A validated 82-item Advance Care Planning (ACP) Engagement Survey measures a broad range of behaviors. However, concise surveys are needed.

Objectives
To validate shorter versions of the Survey.

Methods
The Survey included 57 process (e.g. readiness) and 25 action items (e.g. discussions). For item reduction, we systematically eliminated questions based on face validity, item non-response, redundancy, ceiling effects, and factor analysis. We assessed internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and construct validity with cross-sectional correlations and the ability of the progressively shorter survey versions to detect change one week after exposure to an ACP intervention (Pearson’s correlation coefficients).

Results
501 participants (4 Canadian and 3 US sites) were included in item reduction (mean age 69 years (±10), 41% non-white). Due to high correlations between readiness and action items, all action-items were removed. Due to high correlations and ceiling effects, 2 process-items were removed. Successive factor analysis then created 55, 34, 15, 9, and 4-item versions. 664 participants (from 3 US ACP clinical trials) were included in validity analysis (age 65 years (±8), 72% non-white, 34% Spanish-speaking). Cronbach’s alphas were high for all versions (4-item, 0.84-55-item, 0.97). Compared to the original survey, cross-sectional correlations were high (4-item, 0.85-55-item, 0.97) as were delta correlations (4-item, 0.68-55-item, 0.93).

Conclusion
Shorter versions of the ACP Engagement Survey are valid, internally consistent, and able to detect change across a broad range of ACP behaviors for English and Spanish speakers. Shorter ACP Surveys can efficiently measure broad ACP behaviors in research and clinical settings.

KEYWORDS

advance care planning, surveys and questionnaires, psychometrics

Title

Measuring Advance Care Planning: Optimizing the Advance Care Planning Engagement Survey

Author

Rebecca L. Sudore, Daren K. Heyland, Deborah E. Barnes, Michelle Howard, Konrad Fassbender, Carole A. Robinson, John Boscardin, John J. You

Publish date

2017 Dec 14.

PMID

30511290

Abstract

Background
There is a growing focus on improving the quality and value of health care delivery for high-cost patients. Compared to fee-for-service Medicare, less is known about the clinical composition of high-cost Medicare Advantage populations.

Objective
To describe a high-cost Medicare Advantage population and identify clinically and operationally significant subgroups of patients.

Design
We used a density-based clustering algorithm to group high-cost patients (top 10% of spending) according to 161 distinct demographic, clinical, and claims-based variables. We then examined rates of utilization, spending, and mortality among subgroups.

Participants
Sixty-one thousand five hundred forty-six Medicare Advantage beneficiaries.

Main Measures
Spending, utilization, and mortality.

Key Results
High-cost patients (n = 6154) accounted for 55% of total spending. High-cost patients were more likely to be younger, male, and have higher rates of comorbid illnesses. We identified ten subgroups of high-cost patients: acute exacerbations of chronic disease (mixed); end-stage renal disease (ESRD); recurrent gastrointestinal bleed (GIB); orthopedic trauma (trauma); vascular disease (vascular); surgical infections and other complications (complications); cirrhosis with hepatitis C (liver); ESRD with increased medical and behavioral comorbidity (ESRD+); cancer with high-cost imaging and radiation therapy (oncology); and neurologic disorders (neurologic). The average number of inpatient days ranged from 3.25 (oncology) to 26.09 (trauma). Preventable spending (as a percentage of total spending) ranged from 0.8% (oncology) to 9.5% (complications) and the percentage of spending attributable to prescription medications ranged from 7.9% (trauma and oncology) to 77.0% (liver). The percentage of patients who were persistently high-cost ranged from 11.8% (trauma) to 100.0% (ESRD+). One-year mortality ranged from 0.0% (liver) to 25.8% (ESRD+).

Conclusions
We identified clinically distinct subgroups of patients within a heterogeneous high-cost Medicare Advantage population using cluster analysis. These subgroups, defined by condition-specific profiles and illness trajectories, had markedly different patterns of utilization, spending, and mortality, holding important implications for clinical strategy.

Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (10.1007/s11606-018-4759-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

KEYWORDS

high-cost patients, care management, medicare advantage

Title

Subgroups of High-Cost Medicare Advantage Patients: an Observational Study

Author

Brian W. Powers, MD, MBA,1,2,3,4 Jiali Yan, MS,5 Jingsan Zhu, MS, MBA,6 Kristin A. Linn, PhD,7 Sachin H. Jain, MD, MBA,3 Jennifer L. Kowalski, MS,8 and Amol S. Navathe, MD, PhDcorresponding author6,9

Publish date

2019 Feb

PMID

24222789

Abstract

Taking into consideration the biological activity of the only natural products containing a 1,2,4-oxadiazole ring in their structure (quisqualic acid and phidianidines A and B), the natural product analogs 1-(4-(3-tert-butyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenyl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione (4) and 1-(4-(3-tert-butyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (7) were synthesized starting from 4-(3-tert-butyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)aniline (1) in two steps by isolating the intermediates 4-(4-(3-tert-butyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid (3) and (Z)-4-(4-(3-tert-butyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenylamino)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (6). The two natural product analogs 4 and 7 were then tested for antitumor activity toward a panel of 11 cell lines in vitro by using a monolayer cell-survival and proliferation assay. Compound 7 was the most potent and exhibited a mean IC50 value of approximately 9.4 µM. Aniline 1 was synthesized by two routes in one-pot reactions starting from tert-butylamidoxime and 4-aminobenzoic acid or 4-nitrobenzonitrile. The structures of compounds 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography.

KEYWORDS

antitumor activity, bioisosteres, maleimide, natural product analogs, 1,2,4-oxadiazoles

Title

Synthesis and characterization of novel bioactive 1,2,4-oxadiazole natural product analogs bearing the N-phenylmaleimide and N-phenylsuccinimide moieties

Author

Catalin V Maftei,1 Elena Fodor,1 Peter G Jones,1 M Heiko Franz,2 Gerhard Kelter,3 Heiner Fiebig,3 and Ion Nedacorresponding author4,§ Jeroen S Dickschat, Guest Editor

Publish date

2013;


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