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2(1H)-Quinoxalinone

$52

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0272

  • Specification : 98.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 1196-57-2

  • Formula : C8H6N2O

  • Molecular Weight : 146.149

  • Volume : 25mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0272

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98.0%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

146.149

Appearance

powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Quinolines/Isoquinolines

Category

SMILES

C1=CC=C2C(=C1)NC(=O)C=N2

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

Applications

Density

1.3±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

173.6±22.3 °C

Boiling Point

363.4±22.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

271-272°C

InChl

InChI=1S/C8H6N2O/c11-8-5-9-6-3-1-2-4-7(6)10-8/h1-5H,(H,10,11)

InChl Key

FFRYUAVNPBUEIC-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2935000000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:1196-57-2) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

25921798

Abstract

Since all of the organophosphorus pesticides (OPP) inhibit the cholinesterases with a common mechanism, it is still challenging to detect OPP selectively with inhibition-based biosensors. This study focuses on the conversion of a typical inhibition biosensing to a selective substrate-like biosensing. The interaction of quinalphos with plant-esterase involves not only a decrease in enzyme activity but also a heterolytic bond cleavage of quinalphos. The leaving group eliminated from quinalphos is an ideal biomarker due to its specificity in most OPP. Thus, using 2-hydroxyquinoxaline (HQO), the leaving group of quinalphos, as the biomarker and meso-tetra (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4) as an optical probe, quinalphos can be selectively detected. The molecular recognition between TPPS4 and HQO leads to a considerable sensitivity of the detection. The spectral responses of TPPS4 show a linear dependence on quinalphos concentration in the presence of plant-esterase within the 0.01-1 mg kg(-1) range. The detection limit is 0.01 mg kg(-1), well below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) defined by European Union (0.05 mg kg(-1)) and China (0.2 mg kg(-1)).

Title

Conversion of inhibition biosensing to substrate-like biosensing for quinalphos selective detection

Author

Limin Yang 1, Juan Han 1, Wei Liu 1, Jiqiang Li 1, Lei Jiang 1

Publish date

2015 May 19;

PMID

24953941

Abstract

An aerobic Gram +ve bacterial strain capable of utilizing 2-Hydroxyquinoxaline (2-HQ) as sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from Chrysanthemum indicum Indian agricultural soil and named as HQ2. On the basis of morphology, physico-biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, strain HQ2 was identified as Bacillus sp. The generation time of Bacillus sp. in log phase during growth on 2-HQ is 0.79 h or 47.4 min. The optimal conditions for 2-HQ degradation by Bacillus sp. were inoculum density of 1.0 OD, pH of 6-8, temperature of 37-45 °C and 2-HQ concentration of 500 ppm. Among the additional carbon and nitrogen sources, carbon sources did not influence the degradation rate of 2-HQ, but nitrogen sources-yeast extract marginally enhanced the rate of degradation of 2-HQ. GC-MS analysis of the culture Bacillus sp. grown on 2-HQ indicated the formation of dimers from 2 molecules of 2-hydroxyquinoxaline. The formation of dimer for degradation of 2-HQ by the culture appears to be the first report to our scientific knowledge.

KEYWORDS

16S rRNA sequence analysis; 2-Hydroxyquinoxaline; Bacillus sp.; GC-MS analysis.

Title

Biodegradation of 2-hydroxyquinoxaline (2-HQ) by Bacillus sp

Author

G V Subba Reddy 1, B R Reddy 2, M G Tlou 3

Publish date

2014 Aug 15

PMID

17701694

Abstract

The redox-active quinalphos main metabolite, 2-hydroxyquinoxaline, is particularly effective under excitation by light. We have studied the photocatalytic destruction of melatonin and its precursors, because the cytoprotective indoleamine has been detected in high quantities in mammalian skin. In photooxidation reactions, in which melatonin, N-acetylserotonin and serotonin are destroyed by 2-hydroxyquinoxaline, the photocatalyst is virtually not consumed. Rates of melatonin and serotonin destruction are not changed by the singlet oxygen quencher 1,4-diazabicyclo-(2,2,2)-octane, indicating that this oxygen species is not involved in the primary reactions, so that the persistence of 2-hydroxyquinoxaline has to be explained by redox cycling. This should imply formation of an organic radical, presumably the quinoxaline-2-oxyl radical, from which 2-hydroxyquinoxaline is regenerated by electron abstraction from indolic radical scavengers. Electron donation by 2-hydroxyquinoxaline is demonstrated by reduction of the 2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazolinyl-6-sulfonic acid) cation radical under ultrasound excitation. The compound 2-hydroxyquinoxaline interacts with the specific superoxide anion scavenger Tiron. Formation of oligomeric products from melatonin and serotonin is strongly inhibited by sodium dithionite. Products from photocatalytic indolamine conversion are predominantly dimers and oligomers. No kynuramines were detected in the case of serotonin oxidation, and melatonin’s otherwise prevailing oxidation product N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine, another cytoprotective metabolite, is only formed in relatively small quantities. The proportion between products from melatonin is changed by 1,4-diazabicyclo-(2,2,2)-octane: singlet oxygen, also formed under the influence of excited 2-hydroxyquinoxaline, only affects secondary reactions.

Title

Photocatalytic mechanisms of indoleamine destruction by the quinalphos metabolite 2-hydroxyquinoxaline: a study on melatonin and its precursors serotonin and N-acetylserotonin

Author

Andreas Behrends 1, Sonja Riediger, Sascha Grube, Burkhard Poeggeler, Chandana Haldar, Rudiger Hardeland

Publish date

2007 Aug