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6-Benzyloxypurine

$82

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O1138

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 57500-07-9

  • Formula : C12H10N4O

  • Molecular Weight : 226.23

  • Volume : 5mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O1138

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

226.23

Appearance

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

C1=CC=C(C=C1)COC2=NC=NC3=C2NC=N3

Synonyms

6-phenylmethoxy-7H-purine

IUPAC Name

Density

1.36 g/cm3

Solubility

Flash Point

142ºC

Boiling Point

365.5ºC at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

173-175 °C(lit.)

InChl

InChl Key

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:57500-07-9) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

29681989

Abstract

Background
The grey wolf (Canis lupus) is naturally recolonizing its former habitats in Europe where it was extirpated during the previous two centuries. The management of this protected species is often controversial and its monitoring is a challenge for conservation purposes. However, this elusive carnivore can disperse over long distances in various natural contexts, making its monitoring difficult. Moreover, methods used for collecting signs of presence are usually time-consuming and/or costly. Currently, new acoustic recording tools are contributing to the development of passive acoustic methods as alternative approaches for detecting, monitoring, or identifying species that produce sounds in nature, such as the grey wolf. In the present study, we conducted field experiments to investigate the possibility of using a low-density microphone array to localize wolves at a large scale in two contrasting natural environments in north-eastern France. For scientific and social reasons, the experiments were based on a synthetic sound with similar acoustic properties to howls. This sound was broadcast at several sites. Then, localization estimates and the accuracy were calculated. Finally, linear mixed-effects models were used to identify the factors that influenced the localization accuracy.

Results
Among 354 nocturnal broadcasts in total, 269 were recorded by at least one autonomous recorder, thereby demonstrating the potential of this tool. Besides, 59 broadcasts were recorded by at least four microphones and used for acoustic localization. The broadcast sites were localized with an overall mean accuracy of 315 ± 617 (standard deviation) m. After setting a threshold for the temporal error value associated with the estimated coordinates, some unreliable values were excluded and the mean accuracy decreased to 167 ± 308 m. The number of broadcasts recorded was higher in the lowland environment, but the localization accuracy was similar in both environments, although it varied significantly among different nights in each study area.

Conclusions
Our results confirm the potential of using acoustic methods to localize wolves with high accuracy, in different natural environments and at large spatial scales. Passive acoustic methods are suitable for monitoring the dynamics of grey wolf recolonization and so, will contribute to enhance conservation and management plans.

KEYWORDS

acoustic monitoring, autonomous recorders, Canis lupus, field research, localization estimation, microphone array, wolf howl

Title

Acoustic localization at large scales: a promising method for grey wolf monitoring

Author

Morgane Papin,1,2 Julian Pichenot,3 Francois Guerold,2 and Estelle Germaincorresponding author1

Publish date

2018

PMID

29576793

Abstract

The criteria that local people use for selecting medicinal plants have been a recurrent topic in pharmacology and ethnobotany. Two of the current hypotheses regarding this phenomenon, ecological apparency and diversification, attempt to explain the inclusion of “apparent” and “non-apparent” and native and exotic taxa, respectively, in local pharmacopoeia. This study addresses the following questions: Do “apparent” and “non-apparent” medicinal plants have the same importance in local pharmacopoeia? Do “non-apparent” plants occupy more local categories of diseases than “apparent” plants? Do native and exotic medicinal plants have the same importance? Do exotic and native plants occupy different local categories of diseases? This study was conducted with householders of a community from Northeastern Brazil. Out of the 66 plant species cited, most were herbs (39 species), followed by trees and shrubs (27). Herbaceous species also occupied more local categories of diseases (51) than tree and shrub species (28). Furthermore, most of the species cited by the informants were exotic (42). Out of the 94 therapeutic applications cited in this research, 65 were treated with exotic species and 29 with native species, distributed among 13 body systems. These results support both the hypotheses of ecological apparency and diversification.

Title

What Factors Guide the Selection of Medicinal Plants in a Local Pharmacopoeia? A Case Study in a Rural Community from a Historically Transformed Atlantic Forest Landscape

Author

Taline Cristina da Silva, 1 Josilene Marinho da Silva, 2 and Marcelo Alves Ramos 2

Publish date

2018

PMID

26665074

KEYWORDS

diffusion barrier, photocatalysis, reactive sputtering, SiNx, sol-gel, titanium dioxide film, TiO2

Title

Effect of SiNx diffusion barrier thickness on the structural properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 films obtained by sol-gel dip coating and reactive magnetron sputtering

Author

Mohamed Nawfal Ghazzal,corresponding author1 Eric Aubry,2 Nouari Chaoui,3 and Didier Robert4

Publish date

2015;


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