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Apigenin 7-O-malonylglucoside

$750

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : AV-H17091

  • Specification : 98%

  • CAS number : 86546-87-4

  • Formula : C24H22O13

  • Molecular Weight : 535.43

  • PUBCHEM ID : 5487770

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

AV-H17091

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98%

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

535.43

Appearance

White powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

C1=CC(=C[CH]C1C2=C(C(=O)C3=C(C=C(C=C3O2)OC4C(C(C(C(O4)CO)O)O)O)O)OC(=O)CC(=O)O)O

Synonyms

Malonyl apigenin 7-O-glucoside/7-MAG/Apigenin 7-O-malonylglucoside

IUPAC Name

3-[5-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-yl)-4-oxo-7-[(2S,3R,4S,5S,6R)-3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]oxychromen-3-yl]oxy-3-oxopropanoic acid

Applications

Density

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

Boiling Point

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C24H23O14/c25-8-14-18(31)20(33)21(34)24(37-14)35-11-5-12(27)17-13(6-11)36-22(9-1-3-10(26)4-2-9)23(19(17)32)38-16(30)7-15(28)29/h1-6,9,14,18,20-21,24-27,31,33-34H,7-8H2,(H,28,29)/t14-,18-,20+,21-,24-/m1/s1

InChl Key

ULRLGMUACGKIGP-VKIKYZBHSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:86546-87-4) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

6303788

Abstract
Malonylated apigenin 7-O-glucoside was prepared from malonyl-CoA and apigenin 7-O-glucoside using a malonyltransferase from parsley cell cultures. The enzyme product, as well as the flavonoid substrate, was analyzed by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, confirming that malonic acid had been attached to the primary hydroxyl of the glucose moiety of apigenin 7-O-glucoside. During these studies in several solvents, it became apparent that, in particular, the chemical shift of H-6" A and the coupling constants J5",6"A and J5",6"B were dependent on solvent composition and proton concentration. Similar changes of sugar proton resonance frequencies were also observed with methyl 6-O-malonyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, but not with apigenin 7-O-[6-O-(4-coumaroyl)glucoside]. The change of coupling constants is ascribed to a conformational modification of the sugar portion in the malonylglucosides. Malonylated flavonoid glycosides are exclusively located within the vacuoles of parsley cells. We propose that acylation of flavonoid glycosides which are synthesized in the cytoplasm facilitates transport of the substrates into the vacuole. The conformational modification which is induced by changes in proton concentration may provide a mechanism to trap flavonoids in situ.
Title

Conformational changes of apigenin 7-O-(6-O-malonylglucoside), a vacuolar pigment from parsley, with solvent composition and proton concentration.

Author

Matern U, Heller W, Himmelspach K.

Publish date

1983 Jun 15

PMID

26043039

Abstract
With growing evidence for the positive health outcomes associated with a plant-based diet, the study’s purpose was to examine the potential of shifting adolescents’ food choices towards plant-based foods. Using a real world setting of a school canteen, a set of small changes to the choice architecture was designed and deployed in a secondary school in Yorkshire, England. Focussing on designated food items (whole fruit, fruit salad, vegetarian daily specials, and sandwiches containing salad) the changes were implemented for six weeks. Data collected on students’ food choice (218,796 transactions) enabled students’ (980 students) selections to be examined. Students’ food choice was compared for three periods: baseline (29 weeks); intervention (six weeks); and post-intervention (three weeks). Selection of designated food items significantly increased during the intervention and post-intervention periods, compared to baseline (baseline, 1.4%; intervention 3.0%; post-intervention, 2.2%) χ2(2) = 68.1, p < 0.001. Logistic regression modelling also revealed the independent effect of the intervention, with students 2.5 times as likely (p < 0.001) to select the designated food items during the intervention period, compared to baseline. The study’s results point to the influence of choice architecture within secondary school settings, and its potential role in improving adolescents’ daily food choices.
KEYWORDS

food choice, adolescents, school nutrition, choice architecture, intervention

Title

Food Choice Architecture: An Intervention in a Secondary School and its Impact on Students’ Plant-based Food Choices

Author

Hannah Ensaff,1,* Matt Homer,2 Pinki Sahota,1 Debbie Braybrook,1 Susan Coan,1 and Helen McLeod3

Publish date

2015 Jun;