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Dihydrocucurbitacin F

$180

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : AV-H24035

  • Specification : 98%

  • CAS number : 50298-90-3

  • Formula : C30H48O7

  • Molecular Weight : 520.7

  • PUBCHEM ID : 10481797

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

AV-H24035

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98%

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

520.7

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Hemsleya amabilisDiels;H.macrospermaC.Y.Wu; Hemsleya dolichocarpa W.J.Chang/ Cigarrilla hookerianum

Structure Type

Triterpenoids

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

CC1(C(C(CC2C1=CCC3C2(C(=O)CC4(C3(CC(C4C(C)(C(=O)CCC(C)(C)O)O)O)C)C)C)O)O)C

Synonyms

19-Norlanost-5-ene-11,22-dione, 2,3,16,20,25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-, (2β,3α,9β,10α,16α)-/(1S,2S,4R,9β,16α)-1,2,16,20,25-Pentahydroxy-9,10,14-trimethyl-4,9-cyclo-9,10-secocholest-5-ene-11,22-dione/25-deacetyl hemslecin A/22,23-dihydrocucurbitacin F/Estr-5-en-11-one, 17-[(1R)-1,5-dihydroxy-1,5-dimethyl-2-oxohexyl]-2,3,16-trihydroxy-4,4,9,14-tetramethyl-, (2β,3α,9β,10α,16α,17β)-/23,24-Dihydrocucurbitacin F/dihydrocucurbitacin F/CucurbitacinⅡb/Cucurbitacin Ⅱb

IUPAC Name

(2S,3S,8S,9R,10R,13R,14S,16R,17R)-17-[(2R)-2,6-dihydroxy-6-methyl-3-oxoheptan-2-yl]-2,3,16-trihydroxy-4,4,9,13,14-pentamethyl-1,2,3,7,8,10,12,15,16,17-decahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthren-11-one

Applications

Cucurbitacin IIb is an active component isolated from Hemsleya amabilis, induces apoptosis with anti-inflammatory activity. Cucurbitacin IIb inhibits phosphorylation of STAT3, JNK and Erk1/2, enhances the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), blocks nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65) and decreases mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α[1].

Density

1.22±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Methanol

Flash Point

372.0±28.0 °C

Boiling Point

668.4±55.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

158-159ºC

InChl

InChI=1S/C30H48O7/c1-25(2,36)12-11-21(33)30(8,37)23-19(32)14-27(5)20-10-9-16-17(13-18(31)24(35)26(16,3)4)29(20,7)22(34)15-28(23,27)6/h9,17-20,23-24,31-32,35-37H,10-15H2,1-8H3/t17-,18+,19-,20+,23?,24-,27+,28-,29+,30+/m1/s1

InChl Key

VVBWBGOEAVGFTN-BLGDFNBKSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:50298-90-3) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

23530036

Abstract

Growing evidence demonstrates that extracellular matrices regulate many aspects of megakaryocyte (MK) development; however, among the different extracellular matrix receptors, integrin α2β1 and glycoprotein VI are the only collagen receptors studied in platelets and MKs. In this study, we demonstrate the expression of the novel collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) by human MKs at both mRNA and protein levels and provide evidence of DDR1 involvement in the regulation of MK motility on type I collagen through a mechanism based on the activity of SHP1 phosphatase and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Specifically, we demonstrated that inhibition of DDR1 binding to type I collagen, preserving the engagement of the other collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI, α2β1, and LAIR-1, determines a decrease in MK migration due to the reduction in SHP1 phosphatase activity and consequent increase in the phosphorylation level of its main substrate Syk. Consistently, inhibition of Syk activity restored MK migration on type I collagen. In conclusion, we report the expression and function of a novel collagen receptor on human MKs, and we point out that an increasing level of complexity is necessary to better understand MK-collagen interactions in the bone marrow environment.

KEYWORDS

Bone Marrow, Extracellular Matrix, Hematopoiesis, Phosphatase, Receptors, Discoidin Domain Receptor 1, Megakaryocytes

Title

Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Protein Is a Novel Modulator of Megakaryocyte-Collagen Interactions*

Author

Vittorio Abbonante,‡ Cristian Gruppi,‡ Diana Rubel,§ Oliver Gross,§ Remigio Moratti,‡ and Alessandra Balduini‡¶,1

Publish date

2013 Mar 24.

PMID

27340070

Abstract

We report the complete genome sequences of phages JMPW1 (49,840 bp) and JMPW2 (50,298 bp), two T1-like Escherichia coli phages isolated from contaminated experiment samples. Although the genomes of JMPW1 and JMPW2 share high identity with T1, they show some differences, which are mainly located in several genes with unknown functions and genes encoding tail fiber proteins and endonucleases.

Title

Complete Genome Sequences of T1-Like Phages JMPW1 and JMPW2

Author

Mengyu Shen, Hongbin Zhu, Shuguang Lu, Shuai Le, Gang Li, Yinling Tan, Xia Zhao, Wei Shen, Fuquan Hu,corresponding author and Jing Wangcorresponding author

Publish date

2016 Jun 23

PMID

30844870

Abstract

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and economic burden of peristomal skin complications (PSCs) following ostomy surgery.

DESIGN:
Retrospective cohort study based on electronic health records and administrative data stores at a large US integrated healthcare system.

SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS:
The sample comprised 168 patients who underwent colostomy (ICD-9-CM 46.1X) (n = 108), ileostomy (46.2X) (n = 40), cutaneous ureteroileostomy (56.5X), or other external urinary diversion (56.6X) (n = 20) between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014. The study setting was an integrated health services organization that serves more than 2 million persons in the northeastern United States.

METHODS:
We scanned electronic health records of all study subjects to identify those with evidence of PSCs within 90 days of ostomy surgery and then examined healthcare utilization and costs over 120 days, beginning with date of surgery, among patients with and without evidence of PSCs. Testing for differences in continuous measures between the 3 ostomy groups was based on one-way analysis of variance; testing for differences in such measures between the PSC and non-PSC groups was based on a t statistic, and the χ2 statistic was used to test for differences in categorical measures.

RESULTS:
Sixty-one subjects (36.3%) had evidence of PSCs within 90 days of ostomy surgery (ileostomy, 47.5%; colostomy, 36.1%; urinary diversion, 15.0%; P < .05 for differences between groups). Among patients with evidence of PSCs, the mean (SD) time from surgery to first notation of this complication was 26.4 (19.0) days; it was 24.1 (13.2) days for ileostomy, 27.2 (21.1) days for colostomy, and 31.7 (25.7) days for urinary diversion (P = .752). Patients with PSCs were more likely to be readmitted to hospital by day 120 (55.7% vs 35.5% for those without PSCs; P = .011). The mean length of stay for patients readmitted to hospital was 11.0 days for those with PSCs and 6.8 days for those without PSCs (P = .111). The mean total healthcare cost over 120 days was $58,329 for patients with evidence of PSCs and $50,298 for those without evidence of PSCs (P = .251).

CONCLUSIONS:
Approximately one-third of ostomy patients developed PSCs within 90 days of their surgery. Peristomal skin complications are associated with a greater likelihood of hospital readmission. Our findings corroborate results of earlier studies.

KEYWORDS

Colostomy, Complications, Cost analysis, Ileostomy, Ostomy, Peristomal skin, Stoma, Urostomy

Title

Risk and Economic Burden of Peristomal Skin Complications Following Ostomy Surgery

Author

Charu Taneja, Debra Netsch, Bonnie Sue Rolstad, Gary Inglese, Deanna Eaves, and Gerry Oster

Publish date

2019 Mar 8.