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Euphorbia factor L8

$610

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0380

  • Specification : 98.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 218916-53-1

  • Formula : C30H37NO7

  • Molecular Weight : 523.62

  • PUBCHEM ID : 85236453

  • Volume : 25mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0380

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98.0%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

523.62

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Diterpenoids

Category

SMILES

CC1CC2(C(C1OC(=O)C3=CN=CC=C3)C(C(=C)CCC4C(C4(C)C)C=C(C2=O)C)OC(=O)C)OC(=O)C

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

(1,11-diacetyloxy-3,6,6,14-tetramethyl-10-methylidene-2-oxo-13-tricyclo[10.3.0.05,7]pentadec-3-enyl) pyridine-3-carboxylate

Applications

Density

1.7±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

317.1±31.5 °C

Boiling Point

600.7±55.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C30H37NO7/c1-16-10-11-22-23(29(22,6)7)13-17(2)27(34)30(38-20(5)33)14-18(3)26(24(30)25(16)36-19(4)32)37-28(35)21-9-8-12-31-15-21/h8-9,12-13,15,18,22-26H,1,10-11,14H2,2-7H3/b17-13-/t18-,22-,23+,24-,25+,26-,30+/m0/s1

InChl Key

PJHBZROILRCFRB-JGXPWSQSSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:218916-53-1) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

31192058

Abstract

Background

Disproportionate change in the burden of diabetes mellitus across various subgroups has been reported in the United States. However, changing landscape of the prevalence and mortality of decompensated diabetes (diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS)) remains indistinct across various age, gender, and racial groups of hospitalized diabetics.

Methods

The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) datasets (2007-2014) were sought to assess the prevalence and temporal trends in decompensated diabetes stratified by age, gender, and race and related in-hospital outcomes among the adult patients hospitalized with diabetes using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Discharge weights were used to obtain national estimates.

Results

Of 56.7 million hospitalizations with diabetes, 0.5 (0.9%) million patients revealed decompensated diabetes from 2007 to 2014. The decompensated diabetics consisted of younger (~52 vs. 66 yrs), more often black (24.2% vs. 17.3%) and Hispanic (12.9% vs. 10.9%) patients as compared to those without decompensation (p<0.001). Younger diabetes patients demonstrated the highest prevalence of in-hospital decompensation (18-44 yrs; 3.7%) with a relative increase of 32.4% (from 3.4% to 4.5%) from 2007 to 2014 (ptrend<0.001). Older diabetics (≥65 years) with decompensation suffered the highest in-hospital mortality (12.8%). The overall rate of decompensation was similar (0.9%) among male and female diabetes patients. However, over a period of 8 years, the rates of decompensation rose to 1.1% (ptrend<0.001) in males and 1.2% (ptrend<0.001) in females, respectively. All-cause in-hospital mortality among females with decompensated diabetes declined from 6.6% in 2007 to 5.9% in 2014 (ptrend=0.019). However, there was no significant drop in in-hospital mortality among male diabetics with acute decompensation (6.7% in 2007 to 6.8% in 2014, ptrend=0.811). We observed significantly increasing trends in decompensated diabetes among all race groups between 2007 and 2014 (ptrend<0.001). The in-hospital mortality was highest among Asian or Pacific Islander (0.9%) diabetes patients with decompensation from 2007 to 2014. There was a declining trend in the inpatient mortality among Asian or Pacific Islander (ptrend=0.029) and Hispanic (ptrend<0.001) patients with decompensated diabetes, whereas other race groups did not observe any significant decline in mortality over the study period. Diabetes hospitalizations with decompensation demonstrated significantly higher in-hospital mortality (6.3% vs. 2.6%; p<0.001), average length of stay (7.7 vs. 5.4 days; p<0.001), hospital charges ($65,904 vs. $42,889, p<0.001), and more frequent transfers to short-term hospitals (3.9% vs. 2.9%; p<0.001) in comparison to those without decompensation. The rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (10.4% vs. 4.8%; p<0.001), stroke (4.0% vs. 3.3%; p<0.001) and venous thromboembolism (3.5% vs. 2.6%; p<0.001) were substantially higher among diabetics with decompensation compared to those without. Conclusions There was an increasing trend in the prevalence of decompensated diabetes from 2007 to 2014, most remarkable among younger black male diabetics. The patients with decompensated diabetes suffered higher in-hospital mortality and rates of AMI, stroke and venous thromboembolism, there was no significant decline in the mortality between 2007 and 2014.

KEYWORDS

diabetes mellitus, decompensation, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, myocardial infarction, age gender racial disparities, trends, mortality, stroke

Title

Temporal Trends in the Prevalence of Diabetes Decompensation (Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State) Among Adult Patients Hospitalized with Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Analysis Stratified by Age, Gender, and Race

Author

Rupak Desai,corresponding author1 Sandeep Singh,2 Muhammad Haider Syed,3 Hitanshu Dave,4 Muhammad Hasnain,5 Daniyal Zahid,6 Mohammad Haider,7 Syed Muhammad Ali Jilani,8 Muhammad Ali Mirza,9 NFN Kiran,10 and Ali Aziz11

Publish date

2019 Apr

PMID

19313533

Title

Weekly Reports for October 15, 1897

Publish date

1897 Oct 15;

PMID

19316907

Title

Weekly Reports for March 16, 1894

Publish date

1894 Mar 16