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Flumequine

$64

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O1233

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 42835-25-6

  • Formula : C14H12FNO3

  • Molecular Weight : 261.25

  • PUBCHEM ID : 3374

  • Volume : 5mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O1233

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

-20℃

Molecular Weight

261.25

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

CC1CCC2=C3N1C=C(C(=O)C3=CC(=C2)F)C(=O)O

Synonyms

Apurone/Quinolone/9-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-oxo-1,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrido[3,2,1-ij]quinoline-2-carboxylic acid/FLUMEQUIN/Flumeguine/1H,5H-Benzo[ij]quinolizine-2-carboxylic acid, 9-fluoro-6,7-dihydro-5-methyl-1-oxo-/9-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-oxo-6,7-dihydro-1H,5H-pyrido[3,2,1-ij]quinoline-2-carboxylic acid/Imequyl/9-Fluoro-1,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-1-oxopyrido[3,2,1-ij]quinoline-2-carboxylic Acid/Flumural/Flumequine/Aoyribe/Fantacin/R 802

IUPAC Name

Density

1.5±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Flash Point

219.7±28.7 °C

Boiling Point

439.7±45.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

253-255°C

InChl

InChl Key

DPSPPJIUMHPXMA-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:42835-25-6) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

32231958

Abstract

FSCJ conducted a risk assessment of an antimicrobial, flumequine (CAS No. 42835-25-6), based on reports of JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives) and EMEA (European Medicines Agency) and other documents including the mechanism for liver tumor. Data used in the assessment include pharmacokinetics, acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, genotoxicity, and microbiological effects. FSCJ specified the ADI of flumenquine as 0.071 mg/kg bw per day, that is the microbiological ADI calculated using the equation for VICH.

©2020 Food Safety Commission, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan.

Title

Flumequine (Veterinary Medicinal Products)

Author

Food Safety Commission of Japan

Publish date

2020 Mar 27

PMID

29289913

Abstract

Although there is a growing interest in Fenton oxidation processes based on natural catalysts, the use of laterite soil to promote sequential adsorption/oxidation treatments of fluoroquinolone antibiotics has been scarcely investigated. In this work, the ability of an african laterite containing goethite and hematite to remove flumequine (FLU), used as a representative compound of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, was evaluated under dark and UVA irradiation. Batch experiments and liquid chromatography analyses showed that the presence of laterite can enhance FLU removal from heavily contaminated water through both sorption and oxidation reactions (up to 94% removal of 77 μmol L-1 of FLU and 72% of mineralization). The heterogeneous reaction rate is dominated by the rate of intrinsic surface chemical reactions including sorption and oxidation of FLU, and light-induced reduction of FeIII sites to produce FeII. Based on the probe and scavenging experiments, OH radicals were mainly involved in the heterogeneous oxidation reaction. The photo-assisted Fenton process showed a high efficiency of FLU removal even in the presence of a second fluoroquinolone antibiotic, norfloxacin (NOR), which can be co-found with FLU in affected environments. Determinations of kinetic rate constants and total organic carbon (TOC) for five sequential adsorption/oxidation cycles showed that laterite exhibited no deactivation of surface sites and an excellent catalytic stability. This cost-effective and environmentally friendly remediation technology may appear as a promising way for the removal of fluoroquinolone antibiotics from multi-contaminated waters.

KEYWORDS

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics; Laterite; Oxidation; Sorption; Stability; UVA irradiation.

Title

Use of Laterite as a Sustainable Catalyst for Removal of Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics From Contaminated Water

Author

Mahamadou Kamagate 1, Aymen Amin Assadi 2, Tiangoua Kone 3, Sylvain Giraudet 2, Lacina Coulibaly 3, Khalil Hanna 4

Publish date

2018 Mar;

PMID

29960191

Abstract

The fate of four widely used veterinary antibiotics (doxycycline, flumequine, oxytetracycline and tetracycline) during manure upcycling was investigated at laboratory and pilot scale. The pilot was operated continuously, while the laboratory scale in batch mode. Both set-ups consisted of anaerobic digestion, ammonia stripping and a solid liquid separation step. A partial nitritation anammox process was used to treat the laboratory scale effluent. In the pilot installation, pig manure as feed, natural occurring antibiotics levels were reduced by 92% for doxycycline, 88% for flumequine, 95% for oxytetracycline and 100% for tetracycline. In the laboratory scale set-up, antibiotic free sludge was used and the four substances were spiked. The input antibiotics concentration was reduced by 85% for doxycycline, 46% for flumequine, 97% for oxytetracycline and 100% for tetracycline. In both set-ups the centrifuge cake was identified as the major emission pathway for residual antibiotics. Manure upcycling, while producing fertilizers, can be considered effective in reducing the residual antibiotic load.

KEYWORDS

Anaerobic digestion; Manure up-cycling; Micro pollutants; Veterinary antibiotics.

Title

Behaviour of Doxycycline, Oxytetracycline, Tetracycline and Flumequine During Manure Up-Cycling for Fertilizer Production

Author

J Bousek 1, T Schopp 2, B Schwaiger 3, C Lesueur 3, W Fuchs 4, N Weissenbacher 2

Publish date

2018 Oct 1.


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