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Gelsevirine

$538

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-D1259

  • Specification : 95%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 38990-03-3

  • Formula : C21H24N2O3

  • Molecular Weight : 352.43

  • PUBCHEM ID : 14217344

  • Volume : 10MG

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Catalogue Number

BD-D1259

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

95%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

352.43

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Alkaloids

Category

SMILES

CN1CC2(C3CC4C5(C2C1C3CO4)C6=CC=CC=C6N(C5=O)OC)C=C

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

(1R,2S,5S,6S,7S,8R,11S)-2-ethenyl-1'-methoxy-4-methylspiro[9-oxa-4-azatetracyclo[6.3.1.02,6.05,11]dodecane-7,3'-indole]-2'-one

Applications

Density

1.3±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

229.9±31.5 °C

Boiling Point

456.6±55.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C21H24N2O3/c1-4-20-11-22(2)17-12-10-26-16(9-14(12)20)21(18(17)20)13-7-5-6-8-15(13)23(25-3)19(21)24/h4-8,12,14,16-18H,1,9-11H2,2-3H3/t12?,14-,16+,17-,18+,20?,21+/m1/s1

InChl Key

SSSCMFCWHWCCEH-LGUFPRDESA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:38990-03-3) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

28473664

Abstract

Drug resistance and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching limit conventional treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although several small molecule drugs are clinically used, single drug administration is not sufficient to cure AML, which has a high molecular diversity. Metabolic homeostasis plays a key role in determining cellular fate. Appropriate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) maintain the redox system balance, and excessive amounts of ROS cause oxidative damage, thus providing a strategy to eliminate cancer cells. CPPTL is a novel analogue of parthenolide that exhibited significant cytotoxicity to AML cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, CPPTL’s prodrug DMA-CPPTL decreased the burden of AML engraftment and prolonged survival in a mouse model administered human primary AML cells in vivo. CPPTL induced apoptosis of AML cells by stimulating ROS production, and accumulation of ROS then activated the JNK pathway, thereby promoting mitochondrial damage. These results demonstrated that CPPTL effectively eradicated AML cells in vitro and in vivo and suggested that CPPTL may be a novel candidate for auxiliary AML therapy.

KEYWORDS

CPPTL, acute myeloid leukemia, ROS, JNK pathway

Title

Antineoplastic effects of CPPTL via the ROS/JNK pathway in acute myeloid leukemia

Author

Hui-Er Gao,#1 Yue Sun,#1 Ya-Hui Ding,2 Jing Long,2 Xiao-Lei Liu,1 Ming Yang,1 Qing Ji,1 Ying-Hui Li,1 Yue Chen,2 Quan Zhang,2 and Ying-Dai Gao1

Publish date

2017 Jun 13;

PMID

22840190

Abstract

Background
The burden of fevers remains enormous in sub-Saharan Africa. While several efforts at reducing the burden of fevers have been made at the macro level, the relationship between socioeconomic status and fever prevalence has been inconclusive at the household and individual levels. The purpose of this study was to examine how individual and household socioeconomic status influences the prevalence of fever among children under age five in four sub-Saharan African countries.

Methods
The study used data from the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) from Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya and Sierra Leone with a total of 38,990 children below age five. A multi-level random effects logistic model was fitted to examine the socioeconomic factors that influence the prevalence of fever in the two weeks preceding the survey. Data from the four countries were also combined to estimate this relationship, after country-specific analysis.

Results
The results show that children from wealthier households reported lower prevalence of fever in Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya. Result from the combined dataset shows that children from wealthier households were less likely to report fever. In general, vaccination against fever-related diseases and the use of improved toilet facility reduces fever prevalence. The use of bed nets by children and mothers did not show consistent relationship across the countries.

Conclusion
Poverty does not only influence prevalence of fever at the macro level as shown in other studies but also the individual and household levels. Policies directed towards preventing childhood fevers should take a close account of issues of poverty alleviation. There is also the need to ensure that prevention and treatment mechanisms directed towards fever related diseases (such as malaria, pneumonia, measles, diarrhoea, polio, tuberculosis etc.) are accessible and effectively used.

KEYWORDS

Fever, Children under age five, Sub-Sahara Africa

Title

Socioeconomic status and the prevalence of fever in children under age five: evidence from four sub-Saharan African countries

Author

Jacob Novignoncorresponding author1 and Justice Nonvignon2

Publish date

2012;

PMID

21579017

Abstract

In the structure of the title compound, [Pd(C19H21N2P)2](PF6)2·2.85CH3CN, the two six-membered NHC-phosphane chelate rings form a distorted square-planar coordination geometry around the PdII atom, which lies 0.212 (1) a above the coordination plane. The sum of the bond angles at PdII is 358.3°, with C—Pd—P bite angles of 84.03 (10) and 83.54 (9)°. The structure includes three acetonitrile solvent mol­ecules, one with partial site occupation and one with severe disorder, which was eventually excluded from the refinement.

Title

Bis{1-[2-(diphenyl­phosphino)­ethyl]-3-ethylimidazol-2-yl­idene}palladium(II) bis­(hexa­fluoridophosphate) acetonitrile 2.85-solvate

Author

A. Ahmida Aziza,a Ulrich Florke,a,* Hans Egold,a and Gerald Henkela

Publish date

2010 May 1;