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Hypophyllanthin

$512

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-R0120

  • Specification : 95%

  • CAS number : 33676-00-5

  • Formula : C24H30O7

  • Molecular Weight : 430.5

  • PUBCHEM ID : 182140

  • Volume : 10mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-R0120

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

95%

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

430.5

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Phyllanthus niruri, Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria

Structure Type

Lignans

Category

SMILES

COCC1CC2=CC(=C3C(=C2C(C1COC)C4=CC(=C(C=C4)OC)OC)OCO3)OC

Synonyms

(7R,9S)-9-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxy-7,8-bis(methoxymethyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydrobenzo[g][1,3]benzodioxole

IUPAC Name

(7R,8R,9S)-9-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxy-7,8-bis(methoxymethyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydrobenzo[g][1,3]benzodioxole

Applications

Density

1.158

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

200.8±30.0 °C

Boiling Point

511.1±50.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

129-130℃

InChl

InChI=1S/C18H32O16/c19-1-5(22)9(24)16(6(23)2-20)34-18-15(30)13(28)11(26)8(33-18)4-31-17-14(29)12(27)10(25)7(3-21)32-17/h1,5-18,20-30H,2-4H2/t5-,6+,7+,8+,9+,10+,11+,12-,13-,14+,15+,16+,17-,18+/m0/s1

InChl Key

LBJCUHLNHSKZBW-DSSITSQDSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:33676-00-5) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

27907169

Abstract

The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus sp. str. FPU-7 effectively hydrolyzes chitin by using a number of chitinases. A unique chitinase with two catalytic domains, ChiW, is expressed on the cell surface of this bacterium and has high activity towards various chitins, even crystalline chitin. Here, the crystal structure of ChiW at 2.1 a resolution is presented and describes how the enzyme degrades chitin on the bacterial cell surface. The crystal structure revealed a unique multi-modular architecture composed of six domains to function efficiently on the cell surface: a right-handed β-helix domain (carbohydrate-binding module family 54, CBM-54), a Gly-Ser-rich loop, 1st immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) fold domain, 1st β/α-barrel catalytic domain (glycoside hydrolase family 18, GH-18), 2nd Ig-like fold domain and 2nd β/α-barrel catalytic domain (GH-18). The structure of the CBM-54, flexibly linked to the catalytic region of ChiW, is described here for the first time. It is similar to those of carbohydrate lyases but displayed no detectable carbohydrate degradation activities. The CBM-54 of ChiW bound to cell wall polysaccharides, such as chin, chitosan, β-1,3-glucan, xylan and cellulose. The structural and biochemical data obtained here also indicated that the enzyme has deep and short active site clefts with endo-acting character. The affinity of CBM-54 towards cell wall polysaccharides and the degradation pattern of the catalytic domains may help to efficiently decompose the cell wall chitin through the contact surface. Furthermore, we clarify that other Gram-positive bacteria possess similar cell-surface-expressed multi-modular enzymes for cell wall polysaccharide degradation.

Title

Crystal Structure of Chitinase ChiW from Paenibacillus sp. str. FPU-7 Reveals a Novel Type of Bacterial Cell-Surface-Expressed Multi-Modular Enzyme Machinery

Author

Takafumi Itoh,1,* Takao Hibi,1 Fumiko Suzuki,1 Ikumi Sugimoto,1 Akihiro Fujiwara,1 Koji Inaka,2 Hiroaki Tanaka,3 Kazunori Ohta,4 Yutaka Fujii,5 Akira Taketo,6 and Hisashi Kimoto1,*

Publish date

2016;

PMID

26048811

Abstract

Background
Substance use disorders are regarded as one of the most prevalent, deadly and costly of health problems. Research has consistently found that the prevalence of other psychiatric disorders among those with substance related disorders is substantial. Combined, these disorders lead to considerable disability and health years lost worldwide as well as extraordinary societal costs. Relatively little of the literature on substance dependence and its impact on healthcare utilization and associated costs has focused specifically on chronic drug users, adolescents or women. In addition, the research that has been conducted relies largely on self-reported data and does not provide long-term estimates of hospital care utilization. The purpose of this study is to describe the long-term (24-32 year) healthcare utilization and it’s associated costs for a nationally representative cohort of chronic substance abusing women (adults and adolescents) remanded to compulsory care between 1997-2000 (index episode). As such, this is the first study investigating healthcare costs for women in compulsory treatment in Sweden.

Methods
Women (n = 227) remanded to compulsory care for substance abuse were assessed at intake and their hospital care utilization was retrieved 5-years post compulsory care from national records. Unit costs for ICD-10 diagnoses were applied to all hospital care used from 1975-2006. Attempts are made to estimate productivity losses associated with hospitalization and premature death.

Results
Upon clinical assessment it was found that a majority of these women had a comorbid psychiatric disorder (primarily personality disorder). The women followed in this study were admitted to hospital five to six times that of the general population and had stays six to eight times that of the general population. Total direct healthcare costs per person over the study period averaged approximately $173,000 and was primarily the result of psychiatric department visits (71 %) and inpatient treatment (98.5 %; detoxification and short-term rehabilitation).

Conclusions
Women placed in compulsory care use more hospital resources than that of the general Swedish population and when compared to international research of hospital care use and substance abuse. Direct hospital costs vary greatly over the life course. Effective services can have significant economic benefit.

KEYWORDS

Cost of illness, Program evaluation, Treatment, Prevention, Intervention, Policy, Co-morbidity

Title

Women with comorbid substance dependence and psychiatric disorders in Sweden: a longitudinal study of hospital care utilization and costs

Author

Tina M. Olssoncorresponding author and Mats Fridell

Publish date

2015;

PMID

32270111

Abstract

Background:
Accidents involving biological materials among healthcare providers represent a significant public health problem since they increase the risk of acquisition of viral infections considered to be risk factors for cancer.

Objective:
To describe the profile of workplace accidents involving biological materials for healthcare providers.

Method:
The profile of accidents for the period from 2011 to 2015 was described based on several sociodemographic, occupational and health variables. Specific incidence rates were stratified in three levels to categorize the Brazilian municipalities as a function of the frequency of events.

Results:
Victims were mainly female, nursing technicians and assistants, events mostly occurred during surgical procedures or intravenous medication administration, however, underreporting cannot be ruled out.

Conclusion:
The results point to the need for preventive programs to ensure the physical integrity of healthcare professionals, including continuous training, discussion and participation of the involved parties to achieve a positive impact.

KEYWORDS

accidents, occupational; biocompatible materials; surveillance of the workers health

Title

Profile of healthcare workers involved in accidents with exposure to biological materials in Brazil from 2011 through 2015: surveillance aspects

Author

Helen Paredes de Souza,1 Ubirani Barros Otero,1 and Valeria dos Santos Pinto da Silva1

Publish date

2019;