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Isoflavone

$53

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-D1218

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 574-12-9

  • Formula : C15H10O2

  • Molecular Weight : 222.24

  • PUBCHEM ID : 72304

  • Volume : 20MG

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Catalogue Number

BD-D1218

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

222.24

Appearance

Yellow powder

Botanical Source

Glycine max (L.) Merr

Structure Type

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

C1=CC=C(C=C1)C2=COC3=CC=CC=C3C2=O

Synonyms

Isoflavone/3-Phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one/iso-Flavone/3-phenylchromen-4-one/Isoflavone (8CI)/4H-1-Benzopyran-4-one, 3-phenyl-

IUPAC Name

3-phenylchromen-4-one

Applications

Density

1.2±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

171.1±21.4 °C

Boiling Point

367.0±42.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

150ºC

InChl

InChI=1S/C15H10O2/c16-15-12-8-4-5-9-14(12)17-10-13(15)11-6-2-1-3-7-11/h1-10H

InChl Key

GOMNOOKGLZYEJT-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2914390000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:574-12-9) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

20378106

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To critically evaluate the clinical evidence, and when not available, the animal data, most relevant to concerns that isoflavone exposure in the form of supplements or soy foods has feminizing effects on men.

DESIGN:
Medline literature review and cross-reference of published data.

RESULT(S):
In contrast to the results of some rodent studies, findings from a recently published metaanalysis and subsequently published studies show that neither isoflavone supplements nor isoflavone-rich soy affect total or free testosterone (T) levels. Similarly, there is essentially no evidence from the nine identified clinical studies that isoflavone exposure affects circulating estrogen levels in men. Clinical evidence also indicates that isoflavones have no effect on sperm or semen parameters, although only three intervention studies were identified and none were longer than 3 months in duration. Finally, findings from animal studies suggesting that isoflavones increase the risk of erectile dysfunction are not applicable to men, because of differences in isoflavone metabolism between rodents and humans and the excessively high amount of isoflavones to which the animals were exposed.

CONCLUSION(S):
The intervention data indicate that isoflavones do not exert feminizing effects on men at intake levels equal to and even considerably higher than are typical for Asian males.

Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Title

Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence.

Author

Messina M1.

Publish date

2010 May 1

PMID

30525896

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become one of the most challenging public health problems globally. The increasing prevalence and mortality rates call for more effective therapeutic agents, especially for DM complications. Traditional herbs have a long clinical application history for DM treatment. Puerarin is a natural isoflavone from Pueraria lobata (Wild.) Ohwi which has been consumed both as a functional food and herb in Eastern Asia countries. Documented data has shown that puerarin has cardio-protective, neuroprotective, anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and many other effects. In this review, we will summarize the beneficial effects and underlying mechanisms of puerarin on DM and complications. Puerarin may directly benefit DM by decreasing blood glucose levels, improving insulin resistance, protecting islets, inhibiting inflammation, decreasing oxidative stress and inhibiting Maillard reaction and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation. Furthermore, puerarin may also benefit DM indirectly by retarding and improving a series of DM complications, such as cardiovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, etc. However, comprehensive studies of its effect and mechanisms are needed. In addition, its efficacy is relatively low, which is partially due to its pharmacokinetics profiles. Though puerarin shows low toxicity to experimental animals, its safety on human remains to be clarified. Collectively, we suggest that puerarin might be a potential adjuvant agent for the treatment of DM and DM complications in future.

Title

Management of Diabetes Mellitus with Puerarin, a Natural Isoflavone From Pueraria lobata.

Author

Chen X1,2, Yu J2, Shi J1.

Publish date

2018

PMID

28712053

Abstract

PURPOSE:
Isoflavones have estrogenic properties that may adversely affect pubertal development of boys. We examined if soy isoflavone consumption is associated with age at pubarche (first onset of pubic hair) in a male population with a wide range of soy intake.

METHODS:
Boys aged 12-18 years (n = 248) who attended schools around Adventist universities in Southern California and Michigan self-reported their age at pubarche. Intake of soy isoflavones was assessed using a validated Web-based food frequency questionnaire; consumption levels were designated as low, moderate, and high. Descriptives, time-to-event analysis, and Cox proportional hazards regression that controlled for confounders were performed.

RESULTS:
Energy-adjusted mean intakes were 0.8-54.9 mg/d for total isoflavones, 0.4-22.1 mg/d for daidzein, and 0.4-28.0 mg/d for genistein. Moderate and high total soy isoflavone intake were significantly associated with earlier adjusted median age at pubarche: 12.58 years [RR (95% CI): 1.58 (1.06, 2.36)] for moderate and 12.50 years [RR (95% CI): 1.63 (1.03, 2.60)] for high vs. 13.00 years for low consumers. Similarly, daidzein and genistein consumption was also significantly associated with age at pubarche. No significant associations were found for facial hair for any of the isoflavones.

CONCLUSIONS:
Age at pubarche in this male population widely exposed to soy is within the reported range for boys’ pubarcheal age; moderate/high consumers tend to have it earlier compared to low consumers. Further studies are needed to ascertain that substantial exposure to soy isoflavones does not adversely affect pubertal development of boys.

KEYWORDS

Adolescents; Adventist; Isoflavones; Males; Pubarche; Puberty; Soy

Title

Soy isoflavone consumption and age at pubarche in adolescent males.

Author

Segovia-Siapco G1, Pribis P2, Oda K3, Sabate J3.

Publish date

2018 Sep