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Koaburaside monomethyl ether

$800

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O1566

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 41514-64-1

  • Formula : C15H22O9

  • Molecular Weight : 346.3

  • PUBCHEM ID : 636454

  • Volume : 5mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O1566

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

-20℃

Molecular Weight

346.3

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

This product is isolated and purified from the herbs of Croton cascarilloides

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

COC1=CC(=CC(=C1OC)OC)OC2C(C(C(C(O2)CO)O)O)O

Synonyms

Benzyl alcohol,3,4,5-trimethoxy/3,4,5-trimethoxy-benzenemethanol/3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl Beta-D-glucopyranoside/Benzenemethanol,3,4,5-trimethoxy/3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl alcohol/3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl β-D-glucopyranoside/β-D-Glucopyranoside, 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl/koaburaside monomethyl ether/3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl β-glucopyranoside

IUPAC Name

Density

1.4±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

291.6±30.1 °C

Boiling Point

558.6±50.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChl Key

NBLLRWANAFOKON-ZHZXCYKASA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:41514-64-1) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

24284484

Abstract

Antibiotics cure infections by influencing bacterial growth or viability. Antibiotics can be divided to two groups on the basis of their effect on microbial cells through two main mechanisms, which are either bactericidal or bacteriostatic. Bactericidal antibiotics kill the bacteria and bacteriostatic antibiotics suppress the growth of bacteria (keep them in the stationary phase of growth). One of many factors to predict a favorable clinical outcome of the potential action of antimicrobial chemicals may be provided using in vitro bactericidal/bacteriostatic data (e.g., minimum inhibitory concentrations—MICs). Consequently, MICs are used in clinical situations mainly to confirm resistance, and to determine the in vitro activities of new antimicrobials. We report on the combination of data obtained from MICs with information on microorganisms’ “fingerprint” (e.g., DNA/RNA, and proteins) provided by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, we could follow mechanisms of the bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action simply by detecting the Raman bands corresponding to DNA. The Raman spectra of Staphylococcus epidermidis treated with clindamycin (a bacteriostatic agent) indeed show little effect on DNA which is in contrast with the action of ciprofloxacin (a bactericidal agent), where the Raman spectra show a decrease in strength of the signal assigned to DNA, suggesting DNA fragmentation.

KEYWORDS

Raman spectroscopy, antibiotics, bacteria, bactericidal, bacteriostatic

Title

Following the Mechanisms of Bacteriostatic versus Bactericidal Action Using Raman Spectroscopy

Author

Silvie Bernatova,1 Ota Samek,1,* Zdeněk Pilat,1 Mojmir Šerý,1 Jan Ježek,1 Petr Jakl,1 Martin Šiler,1 Vladislav Krzyžanek,1 Pavel Zemanek,1 Veronika Hola,2 Milada Dvořackova,2 and Filip Růžicka2

Publish date

2013 Nov

PMID

21202847

Abstract

In the title compound, C22H15NO3S, the plane of the carbazole ring system forms a dihedral angle of 65.06 (4)° with the naphthalene ring system. In the crystal structure, a weak intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action is observed between the naphthalene ring system and the sulfonate group. Two weak inter­molecular C—H⋯O inter­actions are also observed.

Title

1-Naphthyl 9H-carbazole-4-sulfonate

Author

R. Arulmozhi,a Jasmine P. Vennila,b Sunil Manohar Babu,c Helen P. Kavitha,d and V. Manivannane,*

Publish date

2008 Jul 1;

PMID

8369407

Abstract

Several laboratories have measured lateral diffusion of single particles on the cell surface, and these measurements may reveal an otherwise inaccessible level of submicroscopic organization of cell membranes. Pitfalls in the interpretation of these experiments are analyzed. Random walks in unobstructed systems show structure that could be interpreted as free diffusion, obstructed diffusion, directed motion, or trapping in finite domains. To interpret observed trajectories correctly, one must consider not only the trajectories themselves but also the probabilities of occurrence of various trajectories. Measures of the asymmetry of obstructed and unobstructed random walks are calculated, and probabilities are evaluated for random trajectories that resemble either directed motion or diffusion in a bounded region.

Title

Lateral diffusion in an archipelago. Single-particle diffusion.

Author

M J Saxton

Publish date

1993 Jun


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