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Limonene

$52

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0646

  • Specification : 95.0%(GC)

  • CAS number : 138-86-3

  • Formula : C10H16

  • Molecular Weight : 136.2

  • Volume : 0.2ml

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0646

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

95.0%(GC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

136.2

Appearance

liquid

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Monoterpenoids

Category

SMILES

CC1=CCC(CC1)C(=C)C

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

Applications

Density

0.8±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

42.8±0.0 °C

Boiling Point

175.4±20.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

-84--104 °C

InChl

InChI=1S/C10H16/c1-8(2)10-6-4-9(3)5-7-10/h4,10H,1,5-7H2,2-3H3

InChl Key

XMGQYMWWDOXHJM-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2902190000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:138-86-3) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

30147808

Abstract

Fragranced consumer products have been associated with adverse effects on human health. Babies are exposed to a variety of fragranced consumer products, which can emit numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), some considered potentially hazardous. However, fragranced baby products are exempt from disclosure of all ingredients. Consequently, parents and the public have little information on product emissions. This study investigates VOCs emitted from a range of fragranced baby products, including baby hair shampoos, body washes, lotions, creams, ointments, oils, hair sprays, and fragrance. The products were analysed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) headspace analysis. Of the 42 baby products tested, 21 products made claims of green, organic, or all-natural. Results of the analysis found 684 VOCs emitted collectively from the 42 products, representing 228 different VOCs. Of these 684 VOCs, 207 are classified as potentially hazardous under federal regulations, representing 43 different VOCs. The most common VOCs emitted were limonene, acetaldehyde, ethanol, alpha-pinene, linalool, beta-myrcene, acetone, and beta-pinene. A comparison between ingredients emitted and ingredients listed reveals that only 5% of the 684 VOCs, including 12% of 207 potentially hazardous VOCs, were listed on the product label, safety data sheet, or website. More than 95% of both green and regular products emitted one or more potentially hazardous VOCs. Further, emissions of the most prevalent VOCs from green, organic, or all-natural products were not significantly different from regular products. Results from this study can help improve public awareness about emissions from baby products, with the aim to reduce pollutant exposure and potential adverse effects on babies.

Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (10.1007/s11869-018-0593-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

KEYWORDS

Baby products, Fragrance, Volatile organic compounds, Emissions, Ingredients

Title

Volatile chemical emissions from fragranced baby products

Author

Neda Nematollahi,corresponding author1,2 Augustine Doronila,2 Patrick J. Mornane,2 Alex Duan,2 Spas D. Kolev,2 and Anne Steinemann1,3,4

Publish date

2018;

PMID

25877377

Abstract

Background
Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids.

Methods
Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary flavours (eg, bubble gum and cotton candy), also analysed were convenience samples of e-cigarette fluids in refill bottles from local ‘vape’ shops and online retailers.

Results
In many liquids, total flavour chemicals were found to be in the ∼1-4% range (10-40 mg/mL); labelled levels of nicotine were in the range of 0.6-2.4% (6 to 24 mg/mL). A significant number of the flavour chemicals were aldehydes, a compound class recognised as ‘primary irritants’ of mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Many of the products contained the same flavour chemicals: vanillin and/or ethyl vanillin was found in 17 of the liquids as one of the top three flavour chemicals, and/or at ≥0.5 mg/mL.

Conclusions
The concentrations of some flavour chemicals in e-cigarette fluids are sufficiently high for inhalation exposure by vaping to be of toxicological concern. Regulatory limits should be contemplated for levels of some of the more worrisome chemicals as well as for total flavour chemical levels. Ingredient labeling should also be required.

KEYWORDS

Nicotine, Packaging and Labelling, Toxicology, Electronic nicotine delivery devices

Title

Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

Author

Peyton A Tierney,1 Clarissa D Karpinski,2 Jessica E Brown,1 Wentai Luo,2 and James F Pankow1,2

Publish date

2016 Apr;

PMID

32251305

Abstract

Explorative experiments were done to figure out differences in the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of not infested trees and trees infested by Anoplophora glabripennis (Asian longhorn beetle, ALB), a quarantine pest. Therefore, VOCs from some native insect species, Anoplophora glabripennis infested Acer, stressed Acer, healthy Acer, Populus and Salix were obtained by enrichment on adsorbents. Qualitative analysis was done by thermal desorption gas chromatography coupled with a mass selective detector (TD-GC/MS). Altogether 169 substances were identified. 11 substances occur from ALB infested or mechanically damaged trees i.e. stressed trees, but not from healthy trees. (+)-Cyclosativene, (+)-α-longipinene, copaene and caryophyllene are detectable only from ALB-infested Acer not from mechanically damaged or healthy Acer. However, these substances are also emitted by healthy Salix. 2,4-Dimethyl-1-heptene is among all tree samples exclusively present in the ambience of ALB-infested trees. It´s rarely detectable from native insect species’ samples.

Subject terms: Chemical biology, Plant sciences

Title

Identification of Anoplophora glabripennis (Moschulsky) by its emitted specific volatile organic compounds

Author

Ramona Makarow,corresponding author Sara Schafer, and Peter Kaul

Publish date

2020