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Neobavaisoflavone

$173

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0037

  • Specification : 98.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 41060-15-5

  • Formula : C20H18O4

  • Molecular Weight : 322.4

  • PUBCHEM ID : 5320053

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0037

Analysis Method

Specification

98.0%(HPLC)

Storage

-20℃

Molecular Weight

322.4

Appearance

Yellow powder

Botanical Source

This product is isolated and purified from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L.

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

CC(=CCC1=C(C=CC(=C1)C2=COC3=C(C2=O)C=CC(=C3)O)O)C

Synonyms

neobavaisoflavone/4H-1-Benzopyran-4-one, 7-hydroxy-3-[4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)phenyl]-/7-Hydroxy-3-[4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)phenyl]-4H-chromen-4-one

IUPAC Name

Applications

Enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells by the bioactive compounds neobavaisoflavone and psoralidin isolated from Psoralea corylifolia.[Pubmed: 21441621]Pharmacol Rep. 2011;63(1):139-48. Numerous compounds detected in medical plants and dietary components or supplements possess chemopreventive, antitumor and immunomodulatory properties. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an important endogenous anticancer factor that induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells. However, some tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Naturally occurring agents could sensitize TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and augment their apoptotic activity.METHODS AND RESULTS:We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of Neobavaisoflavone and psoralidin in combination with TRAIL on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The LNCaP cells were shown to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our study demonstrated that Neobavaisoflavone and psoralidin sensitized TRAIL-resistant cells and markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells. Cotreatment of LNCaP cells with 100 ng/ml TRAIL and 50 μM Neobavaisoflavone or 50 μM psoralidin increased the percentage of the apoptotic cells to 77.5±0.5% or 64.4±0.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS:The data indicate the potential role of the bioactive compounds isolated from the medicinal plant Psoralea corylifolia (Neobavaisoflavone and psoralidin) in prostate cancer chemoprevention through enhancement of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis.

Density

1.3±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Methanol; Ethyl Acetate

Flash Point

197.7±23.6 °C

Boiling Point

545.0±50.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

195-196ºC

InChl

InChl Key

OBGPEBYHGIUFBN-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:41060-15-5) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

28106161

Abstract

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death. The current paradigm in SCD requires the presence of an abnormal myocardial substrate and an internal or external transient factor that triggers cardiac arrest. Based on prior mechanistic evidence, we hypothesized that an unusually cold weather event (a cold spell) could act as an external factor triggering SCD. We tested potential effect modification of prior diagnoses and select pharmacological agents disrupting pathological pathways between cold exposure and death. The home coordinates of 2572 autopsy-verified cases of ischaemic SCD aged ≥35 in the Province of Oulu, Finland, were linked to 51 years of home-specific weather data. Based on conditional logistic regression, an increased risk of ischaemic SCD associated with a cold spell preceding death (OR 1.49; 95% CI: 1.06-2.09). Cases without a prior diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease seemed more susceptible to the effects of cold spells (OR 1.70; 95% CI: 1.13-2.56) than cases who had been diagnosed during lifetime (OR 1.14; 95% CI: 0.61-2.10). The use of aspirin, β-blockers, and/or nitrates, independently and in combinations decreased the risk of ischaemic SCD during cold spells. The findings open up new lines of research in mitigating the adverse health effects of weather.

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death, representing 50-60% of all cardiovascular deaths1,2. The current paradigm in SCD requires the presence of an abnormal myocardial substrate, such as coronary heart disease or a genetic disorder, and a transient external or internal factor that triggers cardiac arrest1,3. Little is known about weather as a potential determinant of SCD4,5,6.

There is substantial evidence that cardiovascular mortality is associated with the ambient temperature of the day or preceding days of the incident7,8. In addition, prolonged periods of exceptionally cold weather, denoted as cold spells, increase mortality in patterns that are less understood. According to our recent systematic review and meta-analysis, cold spells are associated with approximately 11% increase in cardiovascular mortality rates around the world9. The mode of death in these studies is not known. Despite the suggestive epidemiologic evidence and a solid physiological basis discussed later in this paper, there is only a handful of studies on the potential association between cold weather and SCD4,5,6,10,11, and no studies on the association between cold spells and SCD9.

The rationale for our study is that a cold spell, being a transient, sudden, intense weather phenomenon with known effects on the cardiovascular system, could act as a potential trigger of SCD. Establishing an association between cold spells and SCD and the further identification of factors affecting susceptibility would open up previously unexplored possibilities in SCD prevention. A question of practical interest is whether the timely recognition of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) could protect the patient from a later ischaemic SCD during cold weather, and why. Such protection might be accounted to changes in behavior and medication, for example.

The aim of our study was to test the following a priori hypotheses: (a) the risk of ischaemic SCD is increased in relation to cold spells; (b) among the patients suffering ischaemic SCD, the relation between cold spells and SCD is stronger among those without a prior diagnosis of IHD compared to those with a prior diagnosis; (c) the relation between cold spells and SCD is weaker among patients using aspirin, β-blockers, and/or nitrates compared to those without this medication. The hypotheses were based on previous mechanistic evidence illustrated in Fig. 1.

Title

Cold spells and ischaemic sudden cardiac death: effect modification by prior diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease and cardioprotective medication

Author

Niilo R. I. Ryti,1,2 Elina M. S. Makikyro,1,2 Harri Antikainen,3 M. Juhani Junttila,4 Eeva Hookana,4 Tiina M. Ikaheimo,1,2 Marja-Leena Kortelainen,5 Heikki V. Huikuri,2,4,* and Jouni J. K. Jaakkolaa,1,

Publish date

2017 Jan 20.

PMID

30226842

Abstract

Background
Helping consumers make healthier food choices is a key issue for the prevention of cancer and other diseases. In many countries, political authorities are considering the implementation of a simplified labelling system to reflect the nutritional quality of food products. The Nutri-Score, a five-colour nutrition label, is derived from the Nutrient Profiling System of the British Food Standards Agency (modified version) (FSAm-NPS). How the consumption of foods with high/low FSAm-NPS relates to cancer risk has been studied in national/regional cohorts but has not been characterized in diverse European populations.

Methods and findings
This prospective analysis included 471,495 adults from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, 1992-2014, median follow-up: 15.3 y), among whom there were 49,794 incident cancer cases (main locations: breast, n = 12,063; prostate, n = 6,745; colon-rectum, n = 5,806). Usual food intakes were assessed with standardized country-specific diet assessment methods. The FSAm-NPS was calculated for each food/beverage using their 100-g content in energy, sugar, saturated fatty acid, sodium, fibres, proteins, and fruits/vegetables/legumes/nuts. The FSAm-NPS scores of all food items usually consumed by a participant were averaged to obtain the individual FSAm-NPS Dietary Index (DI) scores. Multi-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were computed. A higher FSAm-NPS DI score, reflecting a lower nutritional quality of the food consumed, was associated with a higher risk of total cancer (HRQ5 versus Q1 = 1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.10, P-trend < 0.001). Absolute cancer rates in those with high and low (quintiles 5 and 1) FSAm-NPS DI scores were 81.4 and 69.5 cases/10,000 person-years, respectively. Higher FSAm-NPS DI scores were specifically associated with higher risks of cancers of the colon-rectum, upper aerodigestive tract and stomach, lung for men, and liver and postmenopausal breast for women (all P < 0.05). The main study limitation is that it was based on an observational cohort using self-reported dietary data obtained through a single baseline food frequency questionnaire; thus, exposure misclassification and residual confounding cannot be ruled out. Conclusions In this large multinational European cohort, the consumption of food products with a higher FSAm-NPS score (lower nutritional quality) was associated with a higher risk of cancer. This supports the relevance of the FSAm-NPS as underlying nutrient profiling system for front-of-pack nutrition labels, as well as for other public health nutritional measures.

Title

Nutritional quality of food as represented by the FSAm-NPS nutrient profiling system underlying the Nutri-Score label and cancer risk in Europe: Results from the EPIC prospective cohort study

Author

Melanie Deschasaux, Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,1,* Inge Huybrechts, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,2 Neil Murphy, Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,2 Chantal Julia, Conceptualization, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,1,3 Serge Hercberg, Conceptualization, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,1,3 Bernard Srour, Formal analysis, Writing - review & editing,1 Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Conceptualization, Writing - review & editing,1 Paule Latino-Martel, Conceptualization, Writing - review & editing,1 Carine Biessy, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Writing - review & editing,2 Corinne Casagrande, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Writing - review & editing,2 Mazda Jenab, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,2 Heather Ward, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,4 Elisabete Weiderpass, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,5,6,7,8 Christina C. Dahm, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,9 Kim Overvad, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,9 Cecilie Kyrø, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,10 Anja Olsen, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,10 Aurelie Affret, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,11,12 Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,11,12 Yahya Mahamat-Saleh, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,11,12 Rudolf Kaaks, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,13 Tilman Kuhn, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,13 Heiner Boeing, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,14 Lukas Schwingshackl, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,14 Christina Bamia, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,15,16 Eleni Peppa, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,15 Antonia Trichopoulou, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,15,16 Giovanna Masala, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,17 Vittorio Krogh, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,18 Salvatore Panico, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,19 Rosario Tumino, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,20 Carlotta Sacerdote, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,21 Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,22,23,24,25 Petra H. Peeters, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,26 Anette Hjartaker, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,27 Charlotta Rylander, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,5 Guri Skeie, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,5 J. Ramon Quiros, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,28 Paula Jakszyn, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,29,30 Elena Salamanca-Fernandez, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,31,32 Jose Maria Huerta, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,32,33 Eva Ardanaz, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,32,34,35 Pilar Amiano, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,32,36 Ulrika Ericson, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,37 Emily Sonestedt, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,38 Ena Huseinovic, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,39 Ingegerd Johansson, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,40 Kay-Tee Khaw, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,41 Nick Wareham, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,42 Kathryn E. Bradbury, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,43 Aurora Perez-Cornago, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,43 Konstantinos K. Tsilidis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,24,44 Pietro Ferrari, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,2 Elio Riboli, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - review & editing,4 Marc J. Gunter, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,2 and Mathilde Touvier, Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Supervision, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing1

Publish date

2018 Sep 18

PMID

31417802

Abstract

Six new 1-aroyl-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazines have been prepared, using coupling reactions between benzoic acids and N-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine. There are no significant hydrogen bonds in the structure of 1-benzoyl-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine, C18H20N2O2, (I). The mol­ecules of 1-(2-fluoro­benzo­yl)-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine, C18H19FN2O2, (II), are linked by two C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form chains of rings, which are linked into sheets by an aromatic π-π stacking inter­action. 1-(2-Chloro­benzo­yl)-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine, C18H19ClN2O2, (III), 1-(2-bromo­benzo­yl)-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine, C18H19BrN2O2, (IV), and 1-(2-iodo­benzo­yl)-4-(4-meth­oxyphen­yl)piperazine, C18H19IN2O2, (V), are isomorphous, but in (III) the aroyl ring is disordered over two sets of atomic sites having occupancies of 0.942 (2) and 0.058 (2). In each of (III)-(V), a combination of two C—H⋯π(arene) hydrogen bonds links the mol­ecules into sheets. A single O—H⋯O hydrogen bond links the mol­ecules of 1-(2-hy­droxy­benzo­yl)-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazine, C18H20N2O3, (VI), into simple chains. Comparisons are made with the structures of some related compounds.

KEYWORDS

piperazines, crystal structure, isomorphism, disorder, hydrogen bonding, supra­molecular assembly

Title

Six 1-aroyl-4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazines: similar mol­ecular structures but different patterns of supra­molecular assembly

Author

Haruvegowda Kiran Kumar,a Hemmige S. Yathirajan,a,* Belakavadi K. Sagar,b Sabine Foro,c and Christopher Glidewelld

Publish date

2019 Jul 26