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Osmundacetone

$168

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0927

  • Specification : 98.0%(HPLC&TLC)

  • CAS number : 123694-03-1

  • Formula : C10H10O3

  • Molecular Weight : 178.185

  • PUBCHEM ID : 9942292

  • Volume : 25mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0927

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98.0%(HPLC&TLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

178.185

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Phenols

Category

SMILES

CC(=O)C=CC1=CC(=C(C=C1)O)O

Synonyms

(~{E})-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one

IUPAC Name

(E)-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one

Applications

Density

1.264g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

199.3ºC

Boiling Point

382.5ºC at 760mmHg

Melting Point

173-175ºC

InChl

InChI=1S/C10H10O3/c1-7(11)2-3-8-4-5-9(12)10(13)6-8/h2-6,12-13H,1H3/b3-2+

InChl Key

YIFZKRGUGKLILR-NSCUHMNNSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:123694-03-1) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

25885532

Abstract

Background
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the main causes of death in developing countries. Awareness and perception of risk of TB could influence early detection, diagnosis and care seeking at treatment centers. However, perceptions about TB are influenced by sources of information.

Aim
This study aimed to determine the association between multiple sources of information, and perceptions of risk of TB among adults aged 18-49 years.

Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Ntcheu district in Malawi. A total of 121 adults were sampled in a three-stage simple random sampling technique. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Perceptions of risk were measured using specific statements that reflected common myths and misconceptions. Low risk perception implied a person having strong belief in myths and misconceptions about TB and high risk perception meant a person having no belief in myths or misconceptions and demonstrated understanding of the disease.

Results
Females were more likely to have low risk perceptions about TB compared to males (67.7% vs. 32.5%, p = 0.01). The higher the household asset index the more likely an individual had higher risk perceptions about TB (p = 0.006). The perception of risk of TB was associated with sources of information (p = 0.03). Use of both interpersonal communication and mass media was 2.8 times more likely to be associated with increased perception of risk of TB (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% Confidence interva1[CI]: 3.1-15. 6; p = 0.01). After adjusting for sex and asset ownership, use of interpersonal communication and mass media were more likely to be associated with higher perception of risk of TB (OR, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.65-10.72; p = 0.003) compared with interpersonal communication only (OR 1.6, 95%; CI: 1.13-8.98, p = 0.027).

Conclusion
The study found that there was association between multiple sources of information, and higher perceptions of risk of TB among adults aged 18-49 years.

Title

The Association between Multiple Sources of Information and Risk Perceptions of Tuberculosis, Ntcheu District, Malawi

Author

Robert Chizimba, 1 , 3 Nicola Christofides, 3 Tobias Chirwa, 3 Isaac Singini, 4 Chineme Ozumba, 2 Simon Sikwese, 3 , 5 Hastings T. Banda, 6 Rhoda Banda, 7 Henry Chimbali, 8 Bagrey Ngwira, 9 Alister Munthali, 10 and Peter Nyasulu 2 , 3 ,* Pere-Joan Cardona, Academic Editor

Publish date

2015;