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Procyanidin B-23,3’-di-O-gallate

$1,152

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O0942

  • Specification : 97%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 79907-44-1

  • Formula : C44H34O20

  • Molecular Weight : 882.73

  • PUBCHEM ID : 124016

  • Volume : 5mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O0942

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

97%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

882.73

Appearance

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

C1C(C(OC2=C1C(=CC(=C2C3C(C(OC4=CC(=CC(=C34)O)O)C5=CC(=C(C=C5)O)O)OC(=O)C6=CC(=C(C(=C6)O)O)O)O)O)C7=CC(=C(C=C7)O)O)OC(=O)C8=CC(=C(C(=C8)O)O)O

Synonyms

Procyanidin B2 3,3'-di-O-gallate

IUPAC Name

[(2R,3R)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-8-[(2R,3R,4R)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5,7-dihydroxy-3-(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoyl)oxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromen-4-yl]-5,7-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromen-3-yl] 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate

Density

Solubility

Flash Point

Boiling Point

Melting Point

InChl

InChl Key

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2932990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:79907-44-1) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

26193099

Abstract

Does being from a higher social class lead a person to engage in more or less prosocial behavior? Psychological research has recently provided support for a negative effect of social class on prosocial behavior. However, research outside the field of psychology has mainly found evidence for positive or u-shaped relations. In the present research, we therefore thoroughly examined the effect of social class on prosocial behavior. Moreover, we analyzed whether this effect was moderated by the kind of observed prosocial behavior, the observed country, and the measure of social class. Across eight studies with large and representative international samples, we predominantly found positive effects of social class on prosociality: Higher class individuals were more likely to make a charitable donation and contribute a higher percentage of their family income to charity (32,090 ≥ N ≥ 3,957; Studies 1-3), were more likely to volunteer (37,136 ≥N ≥ 3,964; Studies 4-6), were more helpful (N = 3,902; Study 7), and were more trusting and trustworthy in an economic game when interacting with a stranger (N = 1,421; Study 8) than lower social class individuals. Although the effects of social class varied somewhat across the kinds of prosocial behavior, countries, and measures of social class, under no condition did we find the negative effect that would have been expected on the basis of previous results reported in the psychological literature. Possible explanations for this divergence and implications are discussed.

Title

A Large Scale Test of the Effect of Social Class on Prosocial Behavior

Author

Martin Korndorfer, 1 ,* Boris Egloff, 2 and Stefan C. Schmukle 1

Publish date

2015

PMID

28249046

Abstract

Background
Inclusion of vaccine herd-protection effects in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) can impact the CEAs-conclusions. However, empirical epidemiologic data on the size of herd-protection effects from original studies are limited.

Methods
We performed a quantitative comparative analysis of the impact of herd-protection effects in CEAs for four childhood vaccinations (pneumococcal, meningococcal, rotavirus and influenza). We considered CEAs reporting incremental-cost-effectiveness-ratios (ICERs) (per quality-adjusted-life-years [QALY] gained; per life-years [LY] gained or per disability-adjusted-life-years [DALY] avoided), both with and without herd protection, while keeping all other model parameters stable. We calculated the size of the ICER-differences without vs with-herd-protection and estimated how often inclusion of herd-protection led to crossing of the cost-effectiveness threshold (of an assumed societal-willingness-to-pay) of $50,000 for more-developed countries or X3GDP/capita (WHO-threshold) for less-developed countries.

Results
We identified 35 CEA studies (20 pneumococcal, 4 meningococcal, 8 rotavirus and 3 influenza vaccines) with 99 ICER-analyses (55 per-QALY, 27 per-LY and 17 per-DALY). The median ICER-absolute differences per QALY, LY and DALY (without minus with herd-protection) were $15,620 (IQR: $877 to $48,376); $54,871 (IQR: $787 to $115,026) and $49 (IQR: $15 to $1,636) respectively. When the target-vaccination strategy was not cost-saving without herd-protection, inclusion of herd-protection always resulted in more favorable results. In CEAs that had ICERs above the cost-effectiveness threshold without herd-protection, inclusion of herd-protection led to crossing of that threshold in 45% of the cases. This impacted only CEAs for more developed countries, as all but one CEAs for less developed countries had ICERs below the WHO-cost-effectiveness threshold even without herd-protection. In several analyses, recommendation for the adoption of the target vaccination strategy depended on the inclusion of the herd protection effect.

Conclusions
Inclusion of herd-protection effects in CEAs had a substantial impact in the estimated ICERs and made target-vaccination strategies more attractive options in almost half of the cases where ICERs were above the societal-willingness to pay threshold without herd-protection. More empirical epidemiologic data are needed to determine the size of herd-protection effects across diverse settings and also the size of negative vaccine effects, e.g. from serotype substitution.

Title

Impact of vaccine herd-protection effects in cost-effectiveness analyses of childhood vaccinations. A quantitative comparative analysis

Author

Marisa Holubar, Maria Christina Stavroulakis, Yvonne Maldonado, John P. A. Ioannidis, Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis

Publish date

2017

PMID

27413131

Abstract

Background: The impact of dietary flavonoid intakes on risk of depression is unclear.

Objective: We prospectively examined associations between estimated habitual intakes of dietary flavonoids and depression risk.

Design: We followed 82,643 women without a previous history of depression at baseline from the Nurses’ Health Study [(NHS) aged 53-80 y] and the Nurses’ Health Study II [(NHSII) aged 36-55 y]. Intakes of total flavonoids and subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, polymeric flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins) were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 y. Depression was defined as physician- or clinician-diagnosed depression or antidepressant use and was self-reported in response to periodic questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine associations.

Results: A total of 10,752 incident depression cases occurred during a 10-y follow-up. Inverse associations between flavonol, flavone, and flavanone intakes and depression risk were observed. Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.92 (0.86, 0.98), and 0.90 (0.85, 0.96) when comparing the highest (quintile 5) with the lowest (quintile 1) quintiles, respectively, with evidence of linear trends across quintiles (P-trend = 0.0004-0.08). In flavonoid-rich food-based analyses, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) among participants who consumed ≥2 servings citrus fruit or juices/d compared with <1 serving/wk. In the NHS only, total flavonoids, polymers, and proanthocyanidin intakes showed significantly (9-12%) lower depression risks. In analyses among late-life NHS participants (aged ≥65 y at baseline or during follow-up), for whom we were able to incorporate depressive symptoms into the outcome definition, higher intakes of all flavonoid subclasses except for flavan-3-ols were associated with significantly lower depression risk; flavones and proanthocyanidins showed the strongest associations (HR for both: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.90). Conclusions: Higher flavonoid intakes may be associated with lower depression risk, particularly among older women. Further studies are needed to confirm these associations.

KEYWORDS

depression, epidemiology, flavonoids, geriatrics, Nurses’ Health Study, prospective cohort

Title

Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women

Author

Shun-Chiao Chang,4 Aedin Cassidy,6 Walter C Willett,4,7,8 Eric B Rimm,4,7,8 Eilis J O’Reilly,4,7 and Olivia I Okereke4,5,8,*

Publish date

2016 Sep


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