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Safflor Yellow A

$2,880

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O1869

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 85532-77-0

  • Formula : C27H30O15

  • Molecular Weight : 594.52

  • PUBCHEM ID : 71463725

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O1869

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

-20℃

Molecular Weight

594.52

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

This product is isolated and purified from the stigma of Crocus sativus L.

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

C1=CC(=CC=C1C=CC(=O)C2=C(C3=C(C(C2=O)(O)OC4C(C(C(C(O4)CO)O)O)O)OC5C3OC(C(C5O)O)CO)O)O

Synonyms

3,4,6,9-tetrahydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-8-[(E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoyl]-6-[(2S,3R,4S,5S,6R)-3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]oxy-3,4,4a,9b-tetrahydro-2H-pyrano[3,2-b][1]benzofuran-7-one

IUPAC Name

Applications

Density

1.81g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

313ºC

Boiling Point

942.3ºC at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChl Key

AQMZAOSKHKZGNI-BRESOZKGSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:85532-77-0) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

20036719

Abstract

Cerebral cortical slow-wave activity (SWA) is prominent during sleep and also during ketamine-induced anesthesia. SWA in EEG recordings is closely linked to prominent fluctuations between up- and down-states in the membrane potential of pyramidal neurons. However, little is known about how the cerebellum is linked into SWA and whether slow oscillations influence sensory cerebellar responses. To examine these issues, we simultaneously recorded EEG from the cerebral cortex (SI, MI, and SMA), local field potentials at the input stage of cerebellar processing in the cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) and inferior olive (IO), and single unit activity at the output stage of the cerebellum in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). We found that in ketamine-anesthetized rats, SWA was synchronized between all recorded cortical areas and was phase locked with local field potentials of the GCL, IO, and single unit activity in the DCN. We found that cortical up-states are linked to activation of GCL neurons but to inhibition of cerebellar output from the DCN, with the latter an effect likely mediated by Purkinje cells. A partial coherence analysis showed further that a large portion of SWA shared between GCL and DCN was transmitted from the cortex, since the coherence shared between GCL and DCN was diminished when the effect of cortical activity was subtracted. To determine the causal flow of information between structures, a directed transfer function was calculated between the simultaneous activities of SI, MI, SMA, GCL and DCN. This analysis showed that the primary direction of information flow was from cortex to the cerebellum, and that SI had a stronger influence than other cortical areas on DCN activity. The strong functional connectivity with SI in particular is in agreement with previous findings of a strong cortical component in cerebellar sensory responses.

KEYWORDS

Rat, Deep Cerebellar Nuclei, Cerebral Cortex, Single Unit Activity, Local Field Potential, Directed Transfer Function

Title

Cortico-Cerebellar Coherence and Causal Connectivity During Slow-Wave Activity

Author

Nathan C. Rowland,1 Joshua A. Goldberg,2 and Dieter Jaeger1

Publish date

2011 Mar 17.

PMID

17964035

Abstract

The metal concentrations in a copper mine tailings and Desert broom (Baccharis sarothroides Gray) plants were investigated. The metal concentrations in plants, soil cover, and tailings were determined using ICP-OES. The concentration of copper, lead, molybdenum, chromium, zinc, arsenic, nickel, and cobalt in tailings was 526.4, 207.4, 89.1, 84.5, 51.7, 49.6, 39.7, and 35.6 mg kg−1, respectively. The concentration of all elements in soil cover was 10~15% higher than that of the tailings, except for molybdenum. The concentration of copper, lead, molybdenum, chromium, zinc, arsenic, nickel, and cobalt in roots was 818.3, 151.9, 73.9, 57.1, 40.1, 44.6, 96.8, and 26.7 mg kg−1 and 1214.1, 107.3, 105.8, 105.5, 55.2, 36.9, 30.9, and 10.9 mg kg−1 for shoots, respectively. Considering the translocation factor, enrichment coefficient, and the accumulation factor, desert broom could be a potential hyperaccumulator of Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn, As, and Ni.

KEYWORDS

Phytoremediation, Hyperaccumulator, Heavy metals, Mine tailings, Desert broom

Title

Screening the phytoremediation potential of desert broom (Baccharis sarothroides Gray) growing on mine tailings in Arizona, USA

Author

Nazmul Haque,a Jose R. Peralta-Videa,b Gary L. Jones,c Thomas E. Gill,d and Jorge L. Gardea-Torresdeya,b,*

Publish date

2009 May 1.

PMID

21588264

Abstract

The title compound, C13H13F3N2O2, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit, with different conformations of their ethyl side chains. The dihedral angles formed between the 1H-pyrazole and benzene rings in the two mol­ecules are 79.44 (6) and 77.81 (6)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by O⋯H—N hydrogen bonds into chains propagating along [001] and the packing is further stabilized by π-π inter­actions [centroid-centroid separations = 3.5409 (10) and 3.6335 (10) a].

Title

3-Ethyl-4-phen­oxy-1-(2,2,2-trifluoro­eth­yl)-1H-pyrazol-5-ol

Author

Tara Shahani,a Hoong-Kun Fun,a,*‡ R. Venkat Ragavan,b V. Vijayakumar,b and S. Sarveswarib

Publish date

2010 Aug 1;