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Scutebarbatine A

$2,880

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0704

  • Specification : 98.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 176520-13-1

  • Formula : C32H34N2O7

  • Molecular Weight : 558.631

  • PUBCHEM ID : 45110781

  • Volume : 25mg

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Quantity
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Catalogue Number

BD-P0704

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98.0%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

558.631

Appearance

Powder

Botanical Source

Scutellaria barbata D.Don

Structure Type

Diterpenoids

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

CC1=CCCC2C1(C(C(C(C2(C)C=CC3=CC(=O)OC3)(C)O)OC(=O)C4=CN=CC=C4)OC(=O)C5=CN=CC=C5)C

Synonyms

3-Pyridinecarboxylic acid, (1R,2S,3R,4R,4aS,8aR)-4-[(E)-2-(2,5-dihydro-5-oxo-3-furanyl)ethenyl]-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,8a-octahydro-3-hydroxy-3,4,8,8a-tetramethyl-1,2-naphthalenediyl ester/(1R,2S,3R,4R,4aS,8aR)-3-Hydroxy-3,4,8,8a-tetramethyl-4-[(E)-2-(5-oxo-2,5-dihydro-3-furanyl)vinyl]-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,8a-octahydronaphthalene-1,2-diyl dinicotinate

IUPAC Name

[(1R,2S,3R,4R,4aS,8aR)-3-hydroxy-3,4,8,8a-tetramethyl-4-[(E)-2-(5-oxo-2H-furan-3-yl)ethenyl]-2-(pyridine-3-carbonyloxy)-2,4a,5,6-tetrahydro-1H-naphthalen-1-yl] pyridine-3-carboxylate

Applications

Density

1.3±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

402.6±32.9 °C

Boiling Point

742.1±60.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C32H34N2O7/c1-20-8-5-11-24-30(2,13-12-21-16-25(35)39-19-21)32(4,38)27(41-29(37)23-10-7-15-34-18-23)26(31(20,24)3)40-28(36)22-9-6-14-33-17-22/h6-10,12-18,24,26-27,38H,5,11,19H2,1-4H3/b13-12+/t24-,26+,27+,30-,31+,32+/m1/s1

InChl Key

CFCKNUOZCOKYOO-JUJIBZTHSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:176520-13-1) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

23810916

Abstract

Background
To address inconsistent findings of obesity and prostate cancer risk, we analyzed the association between prostate cancer (PC) and genetic markers of obesity and metabolism.

Methods
Analyses included 176,520 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with 23 metabolic traits. We examined the association between SNPs and PC in 871 cases and 906 controls, including 427 high-grade cases with Gleason ≥7. Genetic risk scores (GRSs) for body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were also created by summing alleles associated with increasing BMI or WHR.

Results
PC was associated with 5 loci, including cyclin M2, with p-values less than 1×10−4. In addition, the WHR GRS was associated with high-grade PC versus controls (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.11, p-value = 0.048), and high-grade PC versus low-grade PC (OR: 1.07, 95% CI 1.01 – 1.13, p-value = 0.03). None of these findings exceed the threshold for significance after correction for multiple testing.

Conclusions
Variants in genes known to be associated with metabolism and obesity may be associated with PC. We show evidence for pleiotropy between WHR GRS and PC grade. This finding is consistent with the function of several WHR genes, and previously described relationships with cancer traits.

Impact
Limitations in standard obesity measures suggest alternative characterizations of obesity may be needed to understand the role of metabolic dysregulation in PC. The underlying genetics of WHR or other Metabochip SNPs, while not statistically significant beyond multiple testing thresholds within our sample size, support the metabolic hypothesis of prostate carcinogenesis and warrant further investigation in independent samples.

KEYWORDS

prostate cancer, genetic association, pleiotropy, obesity

Title

Pleiotropy between genetic markers of obesity and risk of prostate cancer

Author

Todd L. Edwards,1,2 Ayush Giri,1 Saundra Motley, Wynne Duong, and Jay H. Fowke1,3,*

Publish date

2014 Sep 1.

PMID

27026797

Abstract

Background
Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent chronic nonmalignant (noncancer) pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain owing to nonmalignant conditions.

Methods
We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the National Health Service’s Economic Evaluation Database and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and also searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity.

Results
We found comparative evidence of effectiveness and harms in one cohort study at high risk of bias (≥ 3-year follow-up, N = 130). Four economic evaluations of low to very low quality were also included.

Compared with oral opioid analgesia alone or a program of analgesia plus rehabilitation, intrathecal drug delivery systems significantly reduced pain (27% additional improvement) and morphine consumption. Despite these reductions, intrathecal drug delivery systems were not superior in patient-reported well-being or quality of life. There is no evidence of superiority of intrathecal drug delivery systems over oral opioids in global pain improvement and global treatment satisfaction. Comparative evidence of harms was not found. Cost-effectiveness evidence is of insufficient quality to assess the appropriateness of funding intrathecal drug delivery systems.

Evidence comparing intrathecal drug delivery systems with standard care was of very low quality.

Conclusions
Current evidence does not establish (or rule out) superiority or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems for managing chronic refractory nonmalignant pain. The budget impact of funding intrathecal drug delivery systems would be between $1.5 and $5.0 million per year.

Title

Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Noncancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment

Author

Health Quality Ontario

Publish date

2016;

PMID

22163270

Abstract

Background
Without intervention, up to 25% of individuals chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) die of late complications, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. The United States, which in 1991 implemented a strategy to eliminate HBV transmission through universal immunization, is a country of low prevalence. Approximately 3,000-5,000 U.S.-acquired cases of chronic hepatitis B have occurred annually since 2001. Many more chronically infected persons migrate to the United States yearly from countries of higher prevalence. Although early identification of chronic HBV infection can reduce the likelihood of transmission and late complications, immigrants are not routinely screened for HBV infection during or after immigration.

Methods
To estimate the number of imported cases of chronic hepatitis B, we multiplied country-specific prevalence estimates by the yearly number of immigrants from each country during 1974-2008.

Results
During 1974-2008, 27.9 million immigrants entered the U.S. Sixty-three percent were born in countries of intermediate or high chronic hepatitis B prevalence (range 2%-31%). On average, an estimated 53,800 chronic hepatitis B cases were imported to the U.S. yearly from 2004 through 2008. The Philippines, China, and Vietnam contributed the most imported cases (13.4%, 12.5%, and 11.0%, respectively). Imported cases increased from an estimated low of 105,750 during the period 1974-1977 to a high of 268,800 in 2004-2008.

Conclusions
Imported chronic hepatitis B cases account for approximately 95% of new U.S. cases. Earlier case identification and management of infected immigrants would strengthen the U.S. strategy to eliminate HBV transmission, and could delay disease progression and prevent some deaths among new Americans.

Title

The Increasing Burden of Imported Chronic Hepatitis B — United States, 1974-2008

Author

Tarissa Mitchell, 1 , 5 , * Gregory L. Armstrong, 2 Dale J. Hu, 3 Annemarie Wasley, 4 and John A. Painter 1

Publish date

2011;