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SSF-109

$3,600

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BN-O1837

  • Specification : 98%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 129586-32-9

  • Formula : C15H18ClN3O

  • Molecular Weight : 291.77

  • PUBCHEM ID : 86224

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

BN-O1837

Analysis Method

Specification

98%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

291.77

Appearance

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Category

SMILES

Synonyms

IUPAC Name

1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)cycloheptan-1-ol

Applications

Density

1.32g/cm3

Solubility

Flash Point

243.4ºC

Boiling Point

478.9ºC at 760mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChl Key

WRGKWWRFSUGDPX-UHFFFAOYSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:129586-32-9) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

28238994

Abstract

A qualitative inquiry was used to assess if incentives consisting of a hygiene kit, protein-fortified flour, and delivery kit reduced barriers to antenatal care and delivery services in Nyanza Province, Kenya. We conducted 40 interviews (baseline: five nurses, six mothers, one focus group of five mothers; follow-up: nine nurses, 19 mothers) to assess perceptions of these services. Mothers and nurses identified poor quality of care, fear of HIV diagnosis and stigma, inadequate transport, and cost of care as barriers. Nurses believed incentives encouraged women to use services; mothers described wanting good birth outcomes as their motivation. While barriers to care did not change during the study, incentives may have increased service use. These findings suggest that structural improvements-upgraded infrastructure, adequate staffing, improved treatment of women by nurses, low or no-cost services, and provision of transport-could increase satisfaction with and use of services, improving maternal and infant health.

Title

Can incentives reduce the barriers to use of antenatal care and delivery services in Kenya?: Results of a qualitative inquiry

Author

Eleanor Fleming, Joanna Gaines, Katherine O'Connor, Judith Ogutu, Nancy Atieno, Salimah Atieno, Mary L Kamb, Robert Quick

Publish date

2017

PMID

8484187

Abstract

The inhibitory effect of SSF-109 on cholesterol synthesis in isolated hepatocytes was studied using a radio-high-performance liquid chromatography system, and the results were compared with those of other inhibitors, triparanol and AMO-1618. SSF-109 caused accumulation of two trimethylsterols: lanosterol and 24-dihydrolanosterol. The distribution profile of [2-14C]mevalonate-originated radioactivity in cholesterol, lanosterol, dihydrolanosterol, 2,3-oxidosqualene, and squalene indicates that SSF-109 inhibits the 14 alpha-methyl demethylase activity. Triparanol accumulated the radioactivity of [2-14C]mevalonate in desmosterol and 2,3-oxidosqualene suggesting that triparanol inhibits sterol delta 24-reductase and 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase. AMO-1618 caused enrichment of the radioisotope from [2-14C]mevalonate in 2,3-oxidosqualene but reduced it in squalene, suggesting that AMO-1618 acts on 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase and some enzyme that catalizes a metabolic pathway between mevalonate and squalene.

Title

Effect of sterol biosynthesis inhibitor, SSF-109, on cholesterol synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

Author

S Seo 1, K Tonda, A Uomori, K Takeda, M Hirata

Publish date

1993 Feb;

PMID

28238994

Abstract

A qualitative inquiry was used to assess if incentives consisting of a hygiene kit, protein-fortified flour, and delivery kit reduced barriers to antenatal care and delivery services in Nyanza Province, Kenya. We conducted 40 interviews (baseline: five nurses, six mothers, one focus group of five mothers; follow-up: nine nurses, 19 mothers) to assess perceptions of these services. Mothers and nurses identified poor quality of care, fear of HIV diagnosis and stigma, inadequate transport, and cost of care as barriers. Nurses believed incentives encouraged women to use services; mothers described wanting good birth outcomes as their motivation. While barriers to care did not change during the study, incentives may have increased service use. These findings suggest that structural improvements—upgraded infrastructure, adequate staffing, improved treatment of women by nurses, low or no-cost services, and provision of transport—could increase satisfaction with and use of services, improving maternal and infant health.

KEYWORDS

Kenya, prenatal care, women’s health, maternal health services, social determinants of health

Title

Can incentives reduce the barriers to use of antenatal care and delivery services in Kenya? Results of a qualitative inquiry

Author

Eleanor Fleming,a,b Joanna Gaines,b,c Katherine O’Connor,b,c Judith Ogutu,d Nancy Atieno,d Salimah Atieno,d Mary L. Kamb,a and Robert Quickc

Publish date

2017 May 12.