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Sudan II

$43

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BF-S2007

  • Specification : 98%

  • CAS number : 3118-97-6

  • Formula : C18H16N2O

  • Molecular Weight : 276.33

  • PUBCHEM ID : 18386

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

BF-S2007

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

98%

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

276.33

Appearance

White crystalline powder

Botanical Source

synthesis

Structure Type

Others

Category

Standards;Natural Pytochemical;API

SMILES

CC1=CC(=C(C=C1)N=NC2=C(C=CC3=CC=CC=C32)O)C

Synonyms

Red B/FAT RED/1-(2,4-Xylidylazo)-2-naphthol/AKA505/1-(2,4-Xylylazo)-2-naphthol,Solvent Orange 7/2,4-dimethyl-1-phenylazo-2-naphthol/redno.5/Rot B/SUDAN 2/1-(2',4'-dimethylbenzeneazo)-2-naphthol/1-[(2,4-dimethylphenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenol/m-Xylol-(4 azo 1)-naphthol-(2)/SUDAN/1,2-Naphthalenedione, 1-[2-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)hydrazone], (1Z)-/1-(2,4-Dimethyl-phenylazo)-[2]naphthol/Solvent Orange 7/(1Z)-1-[(2,4-Dimethylphenyl)hydrazono]-2(1H)-naphthalenone/Sudan II [=1-(2,4-Xylidylazo)-2-naphthol]

IUPAC Name

1-[(2,4-dimethylphenyl)diazenyl]naphthalen-2-ol

Density

1.1±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Flash Point

213.6±31.5 °C

Boiling Point

1.1±0.1 g/cm3

Melting Point

156-158ºC

InChl

InChl Key

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

3204190000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:3118-97-6) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

PMID

31535956

Abstract

Non-destructive, simple and fast techniques for identifying authentic palm oil and those adulterated with Sudan dyes using portable NIR spectroscopy would be very beneficial to West Africa countries and the world at large. In this study, a portable NIR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate models were developed for detecting palm oil adulteration. A total of 520 samples of palm oil were used comprising; 40 authentic samples together with 480 adulterated samples containing Sudan dyes (I, II, III, IV of 120 samples each). Multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) preprocessing technique plus Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract relevant spectral information which gave visible cluster trends for authentic samples and adulterated ones. The performance of Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and Support vector machine (SVM) were compared, and SVM showed superiority over LDA. The optimised results by cross-validation revealed that MSC-PCA + SVM gave an identification rate above 95% for both calibration and prediction sets. The overall results show that portable NIR spectroscopy together with MSC-PCA + SVM model could be used successfully to identify authentic palm oils from adulterated ones. This would be useful for quality control officers and consumers to manage and control Sudan dyes adulteration in red palm oil.

KEYWORDS

Palm oil; linear discriminant analysis; portable NIR spectroscopy; quality control; support vector machine

Title

Rapid and nondestructive fraud detection of palm oil adulteration with Sudan dyes using portable NIR spectroscopic techniques.

Author

Teye E1, Elliott C2, Sam-Amoah LK1, Mingle C3.

Publish date

2019 Nov

PMID

30797322

Abstract

The use of food dyes in meat is subject to regulations, due to food safety concerns. A reliable method for the determination of 12 food dyes (Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Carmine, Ponceau SX, Ponceau 3R, Allura Red AC, Carmoisine, Erythrosine, Sudan I, Sudan II, Sudan III and Sudan IV) in meat products using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV-diode array detection was developed, optimized and fully validated. The extraction was accomplished using acetonitrile, methanol, water, ammonia, 50:40:9:1 (v/v/v/v) as the solvent, and an ultrasonic bath. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 RP column and samples eluted with a gradient acetate-acetonitrile mobile phase. Good analytical performance was obtained, in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and ruggedness. Both method precision (CV% range: 6.2%-18.0%) and recovery (range: 86.4%-105.0%) complied with Decision 657/2002/EC, suggesting the procedure could be applied successfully for analyses of meat products in the European Union.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS

Allura Red AC (PubChem CID: 5360805); Amaranth (PubChem CID: 5359521); Carmine (PubChem CID: 14950); Carmoisine (PubChem CID: 6321394); Erythrosine (PubChem CID: 12961638); Food colorings; Food dyes; Food safety; Fresh meat preparations; HPLC; Meat products; Ponceau 3R (PubChem CID: 5359885); Ponceau 4R (PubChem CID: 9570119); Ponceau SX (PubChem CID: 9595288); Sudan I (PubChem CID: 5858445); Sudan II (PubChem CID: 5809936); UV-diode array detection; Validation

Title

Simultaneous determination of twelve dyes in meat products: Development and validation of an analytical method based on HPLC-UV-diode array detection.

Author

Iammarino M1, Mentana A2, Centonze D3, Palermo C4, Mangiacotti M5, Chiaravalle AE6.

Publish date

2019 Jul 1

PMID

30722927

Abstract

Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) assisted with electrochemical techniques was applied for simultaneous determination of Sudan II and III at a surface of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) modified carbon paste electrode. Characterization of the ZnONPs and the nanostructured modified electrode was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. Response surface methodology using central composite rotatable design was employed to design of experiments and achieving to optimum values of variables. For simultaneous determination of Sudan II and III, electrochemical second order data were obtained by changing of pulse height in differential pulse voltammetry technique. MCR-ALS was performed on the data to obtain the decomposition peaks of analytes. Then, the detection limits were obtained 1.87 and 2.62 nM for Sudan II and III, respectively. Finally, this method used for the analysis of the two analytes in real samples.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS

Differential pulse voltammetry; MCR-ALS; Response surface methodology; Second order data; Sudan dyes; ZnO nanoparticles

Title

Chemometrics-assisted determination of Sudan dyes using zinc oxide nanoparticle-based electrochemical sensor.

Author

Heydari M1, Ghoreishi SM2, Khoobi A1.

Publish date

2019 Jun 15


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