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Vitexin 2”-O-p-coumarate

$840

  • Brand : BIOFRON

  • Catalogue Number : BD-P0056

  • Specification : 99.0%(HPLC)

  • CAS number : 59282-55-2

  • Formula : C30H26O12

  • Molecular Weight : 578.52

  • PUBCHEM ID : 101422334

  • Volume : 20mg

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Catalogue Number

BD-P0056

Analysis Method

HPLC,NMR,MS

Specification

99.0%(HPLC)

Storage

2-8°C

Molecular Weight

578.52

Appearance

Yellow powder

Botanical Source

Structure Type

Flavonoids

Category

SMILES

C1=CC(=CC=C1C=CC(=O)OC2C(C(C(OC2C3=C(C=C(C4=C3OC(=CC4=O)C5=CC=C(C=C5)O)O)O)CO)O)O)O

Synonyms

[(2S,3R,4S,5S,6R)-2-[5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxochromen-8-yl]-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-3-yl] (E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoate

IUPAC Name

[(2S,3R,4S,5S,6R)-2-[5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxochromen-8-yl]-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-3-yl] (E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoate

Applications

Density

1.7±0.1 g/cm3

Solubility

Soluble in Chloroform,Dichloromethane,Ethyl Acetate,DMSO,Acetone,etc.

Flash Point

292.8±27.8 °C

Boiling Point

884.1±65.0 °C at 760 mmHg

Melting Point

InChl

InChI=1S/C30H26O12/c31-13-22-26(38)27(39)30(42-23(37)10-3-14-1-6-16(32)7-2-14)29(41-22)25-19(35)11-18(34)24-20(36)12-21(40-28(24)25)15-4-8-17(33)9-5-15/h1-12,22,26-27,29-35,38-39H,13H2/b10-3+/t22-,26-,27+,29+,30-/m1/s1

InChl Key

FJGOEBQRHWKKJH-HORBVDEJSA-N

WGK Germany

RID/ADR

HS Code Reference

2933990000

Personal Projective Equipment

Correct Usage

For Reference Standard and R&D, Not for Human Use Directly.

Meta Tag

provides coniferyl ferulate(CAS#:59282-55-2) MSDS, density, melting point, boiling point, structure, formula, molecular weight etc. Articles of coniferyl ferulate are included as well.>> amp version: coniferyl ferulate

No Technical Documents Available For This Product.

PMID

31584952

Abstract

Background
Despite the well-recognised relevance of screening in colorectal cancer (CRC) control, adherence to screening is often suboptimal. Improving adherence represents an important public health strategy. We investigated the influence of family doctors (FDs) as determinant of CRC screening adherence by comparing each FDs practice participation probability to that of the residents in the same geographic areas using the whole population geocoded.

Methods
We used multilevel logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with CRC screening adherence, among 333,843 people at their first screening invitation. Standardized Adherence Rates (SAR) by age, gender, and socioeconomic status were calculated comparing FDs practices to the residents in the same geographic areas using geocoded target population.

Results
Screening adherence increased from 41.0% (95% CI, 40.8-41.2) in 2006-2008 to 44.7% (95% CI, 44.5-44.9) in 2011-2012. Males, the most deprived and foreign-born people showed low adherence. FD practices and the percentage of foreign-born people in a practice were significant clustering factors. SAR for 145 (21.4%) FDs practices differed significantly from people living in the same areas. Predicted probabilities of adherence were 31.7% and 49.0% for FDs with low and high adherence, respectively.

Discussion
FDs showed a direct and independent effect to the CRC screening adherence of the people living in their practice. FDs with significantly high adherence level could be the key to adherence improvement.

Impact
Most deprived individuals and foreigners represent relevant targets for interventions in public health aimed to improve CRC screening adherence.

Title

Geospatial analysis of the influence of family doctor on colorectal cancer screening adherence

Author

Fabrizio Stracci, Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Writing - original draft, Writing - review & editing,#1,2,* Alessio Gili, Formal analysis, Methodology,2 Giulia Naldini, Writing - review & editing,3 Vincenza Gianfredi, Writing - original draft,3 Morena Malaspina, Data curation, Writing - review & editing,4 Basilio Passamonti, Data curation, Writing - review & editing,4 and Fortunato Bianconi, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Software, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing - review & editing#2 Hajo Zeeb, Editor

Publish date

2019

PMID

27746946

Abstract

The crystal and mol­ecular structures of two tri­phenyl­tin di­thio­carbamates, [Sn(C6H5)3(C16H16NS2)], (I), and [Sn(C6H5)3(C7H14NO2S2)], (II), are described. In (I), the di­thio­carbamate ligand coordinates the SnIV atom in an asymmetric manner, leading to a highly distorted trigonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry defined by a C3S2 donor set with the weakly bound S atom approximately trans to one of the ipso-C atoms. A similar structure is found in (II), but the di­thio­carbamate ligand coordinates in an even more asymmetric fashion. The packing in (I) features supra­molecular chains along the c axis sustained by C—H⋯π inter­actions; chains pack with no directional inter­actions between them. In (II), supra­molecular layers are formed, similarly sustained by C—H⋯π inter­actions; these stack along the b axis. An analysis of the Hirshfeld surfaces for (I) and (II) confirms the presence of the C—H⋯π inter­actions but also reveals the overall dominance of H⋯H contacts in the respective crystals

KEYWORDS

crystal structure, organotin, di­thio­carbamate, Hirshfeld surface analysis

Title

[N-Benzyl-N-(2-phenyl­eth­yl)di­thio­carbamato-κ2 S,S′]tri­phenyl­tin(IV) and [bis­(2-meth­oxy­eth­yl)di­thio­carbamato-κ2 S,S′]tri­phenyl­tin(IV): crystal structures and Hirshfeld surface analysis

Author

Rapidah Mohamad,a Normah Awang,b,‡ Nurul Farahana Kamaludin,b,§ Mukesh M. Jotani,c and Edward R. T. Tiekinkd,*

Publish date

2016 Oct 1

PMID

28361842

Abstract

Background/Aim:
Dyspepsia has a significant impact on the quality of life. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can be assessed by disease-specific and generic HRQoL instruments. The present study evaluated HRQoL and compared it among dyspepsia subgroups by using EQ (Euro QoL)-5D questionnaire.

Patients and Methods:
Patients with abnormal findings on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were classified to have organic dyspepsia, whereas those with normal endoscopy were classified as functional dyspepsia if they met the ROME III criteria or as endoscopy negative recent dyspepsia if symptom duration was <6 months. HRQoL was assessed using the EQ-5D questionnaire, and the overall health status on a visual analogue scale (VAS); and the frequency of impairment in each dimension were compared between the dyspepsia subgroups. Results: The overall health status was affected equally in all three dyspepsia subgroups. Impairment in HRQoL was commonly seen in the dimensions of pain (98.4%), usual activities (66.20%), and anxiety/depression (70.60%), however, much less so in mobility (22.70%) and self-care (10.9%). Any impairment in HRQoL was not significantly different between the three subgroups in the dimensions of mobility and usual activities. Self-care was more commonly affected in organic dyspepsia, anxiety/depression was more common with functional dyspepsia, while pain, though significantly different among various subgroups, was very common in all three subgroups. Conclusion: HRQoL was equally affected in all three subgroups of dyspepsia but variably so in the different domains of EQ-5D. These differences need to be studied further to improve the management of different etiological subgroups of dyspepsia.

KEYWORDS

Dyspepsia, endoscopy, quality of life

Title

Quality of Life in Dyspepsia and its Subgroups Using EQ-5D (EuroQol) Questionnaire

Author

Anurag J. Shetty, Girisha Balaraju, Shiran Shetty, and Cannanore G. Pai

Publish date

2017 Mar-Apr